3-year-old unknowingly teaches her mother a lesson when she questions why she won’t buy a bikini

September 25, 2017 3:58 pm Last Updated: September 25, 2017 4:41 pm

Shopping for a bathing suit is almost never a pleasant experience. If it’s not one thing, it’s another. And often times it’s these “things” that prevent many women from purchasing the type of bathing suit they really want.

Shelby Goodrich was recently out shopping with her three year old daughter when she learned an important lesson.

Goodrich detailed her experience in a post on Instagram.

|| Yea, I'm gonna rock it || in honor of @nonairbrushedme #ALWAYSABEACHBODY My daughter starts swim lessons tomorrow. And, I hate to admit this, but she should have started two years ago. But my fear of getting in a pool, in front of others, who knew me, in a bathing suit won. . . I'm actively trying to be brave and get over stupid freaking anxiety issues. I know damn well she, at 3, cares more about playing with glitter and dolls and in the mud with her brother than what her mom wears. . . But she's smart. She is watching me. She's a little spitfire. She says what she thinks. She is brave and bold and stands up for herself. She tells me all the time how pretty she is and how strong she is. And I want to be like her. . . So today, as we talked about swim class tomorrow, she said " I want a bikini." And off we went to Target. She picked hers out, all on her own. Then she said, " your turn." . . A knot in my stomach, I told her, "oh mommy can't wear a bikini to swim class, boo." She looked up from the cart and asked, "but why?" . . Why? Seriously though, why couldn't I? I could. I just felt uncomfortable. Observed. Exposed. A bit like I'd embarrass her. But all of those sounded selfish in the moment, so I said, " you know what? You're right. Let's get mommy a bikini." . . Because she is learning, every day, from me just how to view her OWN body. I don't want to teach her to put limitations on what clothes she can wear or to worry about what others will think. I certainly want her to see her body as unique and wonderful and to be kind to it. I want her to always stay the brave, bold blonde little girl who knows exactly what she wants and exactly how beautiful and strong she is. The same little girl I used to be, before life and society taught me I shouldn't be. . . So we bought bikinis. We rushed home, we played and spent the afternoon excited about how we'd be mermaids tomorrow. And we tried on our bikinis. Like the brave, bold beautiful blondes we are. #mypcosbody ( reshare in honor of #alwaysabeachbody)

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Goodrich, who suffers polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and is an advocate for the hormonal disorder, shared with her nearly 60,000 followers that for almost two years she put off enrolling her daughter in swim class because she was nervous about getting in a pool in front of others.

She wrote that she’s trying to get over “stupid freaking anxiety issues” and is fully aware her daughter is more concerned with other things than what her mom wears. But still, it’s something she struggles with.

After nearly 2 years of putting it off Goodrich signed her daughter up for swim class.

|| She's watching || Being a mom is an incredible responsibility. Being a mom of a daughter? Feels like the biggest responsibility of all. And listen to me when I say I don't post my children on social media for a reason. But this? This story? Is important. My daughter is everything I dream a girl can be-smart. Kind. Confident. Sassy. Independent. As much as she can be for being all of 3 years old. And most days I am super proud of the things I teach her. But today, as I stood in the mirror, staring at my perceived flaws, I caught a glimpse of her as she walked in. Her face, looked in awe, and said.." your duppa cute mama". I was feeling less than cute duppa (where are my polish loves who know what a fucking duppa is?!! Na zdrowie to you ) status while standing there. In fact, I had shamefully been critiquing and picking apart my reflection for the better part of an hour. And I turned to her and asked, " what makes momma cute, Amelia?" Her response? " you always use the best voices during story time and always hug me the tightest and you make really good macaroni and cheese, even when you're sad and can't eat it with me." Not one ounce of what she thinks makes her mama cute is reflected in the mirror we stood in front of. Not ONE BIT. Why is this important? As a woman online, I strive to show women that the least important thing about them is their reflection. So at home, I need to remember to follow suit. I need her to grow up knowing she's cute because she always kisses her brother goodnight, never forgets to say I love you, belly laughs at goat videos and gives the biggest hugs of any 30 lb 3 year old alive. It's easy to lose sight of your impact on another human. Near or far. Stranger on the internet, or tiny beautiful human who calls you mama. But they're watching. They're learning. They're learning to love themselves how you do it yourself. So I swooped thag baby up, told her she's the most beautiful girl in the world, and promised to do my best to remind her of that- everyday. By words and by example. Every day. Because she needs me to. 💕💕

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While her daughter may only be three years old, Goodrich knows she radiates self-confidence and a recent trip to Target proved just that.

Goodrich’s little girl proudly stated that she wanted a bikini for her swim class, so the mother and and daughter headed off to Target. While at the store, she picked out her bathing suit and then turned to Goodrich and said, “Your turn.”

“A knot in my stomach, I told her, ‘Oh mommy can’t wear a bikini to swim class, boo.’ She looked up from the cart and asked, ‘But why?'” she wrote.

When her daughter asked why she wasn’t going to buy a bikini, Goodrich took a minute to think about it.

Immediately a number of reasons came to mind, but as Goodrich wrote, they sounded “selfish.” So rather than rattle off a list of excuses, she told her daughter she’d purchase a bikini as well.

Goodrich saw significance in the moment and knew her daughter did as well, though it might not be as obvious to her. She wrote that it was important she learn to conquer her fears when it comes to clothing, because every day she is teaching her daughter to love her body.

I don’t want to teach her to put limitations on what clothes she can wear or to worry about what others will think. I certainly want her to see her body as unique and wonderful and to be kind to it. I want her to always stay the brave, bold blonde little girl who knows exactly what she wants and exactly how beautiful and strong she is. The same little girl I used to be, before life and society taught me I shouldn’t be.

It was a learning experience for both mother and daughter.

“She is brave and bold and stands up for herself,” she wrote. “She tells me all the time how pretty she is and how strong she is. And I want to be like her.”