Yoga’s Age-Defying Effects Confirmed by Science

April 3, 2015 2:18 pm Last Updated: April 3, 2015 2:25 pm

Yoga has long been believed to be a life-extending practice, with yogis maintaining a level of strength and flexibility late into life far beyond what is considered normal or easily attainable in cultures that don’t practice yoga or related mind-body integrating disciplines. 

You can observe an example of yoga’s age-defying properties below in the video of Swami Yogananda Maharaji Ji, which at the time of his filming was 104 years of age: 

It turns out that 2014 was a watershed year in proving the amazing potential of this at least 5,000 year old practice in helping to decelerate and in some cases reverse various age-related declines in body wide health.   

One particularly powerful study published last year in the journal Age titled, “Age-related changes in cardiovascular system, autonomic functions, and levels of BDNF of healthy active males: role of yogic practice“, found that a brief yoga intervention (3 months) resulted in widespread improvements in cardiovascular and neurological function.

A Plethora of Health Benefits for Age-Related Ailments Through Yoga Practice

There are a number of promising studies revealing the age-defying potential of this ancient practice. Here are some additional benefits confirmed in 2014 alone:

This is just a small sampling of the literature. There is older research revealing that yoga has even more benefits for aging populations. 

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That said, yoga isn’t really about research, its about directly experiencing it and engaging in regular practice. We hope this article encourages those unfamiliar with the practice to give it a try and to reassure those who are already regular practitioners that they are indeed validated in their yoga efforts and experiences.

This article was originally published on www.GreenMedInfo.com. Join their free GreenMedInfo.com newsletter.

*Image of “yoga” via Beth Scupham/Flickr