Shen Yun a Holiday Tradition for Families

HOUSTON—Doctor Steve Le, a clinic owner in Houston, brought his family to see Shen Yun Performing Arts for the third holiday season in three years and plans to continue the tradition.

Le and his wife are devout Buddhists, and the first year they saw Shen Yun, the large image of a golden Buddha opened the performance.

“My wife and I, when we saw that the first year, we thought ‘Wow, this is very good,'” Mr. Le said. They returned with more family members this year at the Jones Hall for the Performing Arts in Houston, Dec. 24.

New York-based Shen Yun was formed by artists around the world to revive 5,000 years of Chinese civilization. The teachings of Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism are ideals that are part of the essence of the traditional Chinese culture.

“Buddha is just part of it,” Mr. Le said.

What kept Mr. Le and his family coming back was “the whole Shen Yun atmosphere,” he said.

The respect for the divine is the “heart and soul of traditional Chinese culture,” according to Shen Yun’s website. And this culture is presented on stage through music and dance.

The performers are trained in classical Chinese dance and ethnic and folk dances from the many ethnic regions of China. From the use of long, flowing silk sleeves to express emotion to the animated digital backdrop that helps Shen Yun tell stories, every part of the performance comes together to revive 5,000 years of a divinely inspired culture.

“Everything comes together,” Mr. Le said. “The music is very nice and the costumes … [are] very beautiful, and the dancing itself.”

“We just kept coming back,” Mr. Le said.

Reporting by Sally Sun and Catherine Yang

New York-based Shen Yun Performing Arts has four touring companies that perform simultaneously around the world. For more information, visit Shen Yun Performing Arts.

The Epoch Times considers Shen Yun Performing Arts the significant cultural event of our time. We have proudly covered audience reactions since Shen Yun’s inception in 2006.