Here’s an Example of Why You Should Read an Office Card Before Signing It

By Jonathan Zhou
Jonathan Zhou
Jonathan Zhou
Jonathan Zhou is a tech reporter who has written about drones, artificial intelligence, and space exploration.
May 12, 2016 Updated: May 15, 2016

An office card posted on Reddit shows why you should always read what you’re signing.

The card was for a colleague whose loved one had passed away, but someone had signed “Happy B’day.”

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Nothing is known about the card except that the bereaved woman is named “Jessica.” The picture prompted Redditers to share their own stories of card-signing, in the office and elsewhere.

“Once, at work I had two cards to sign. One was a happy birthday card, the other was a condolences card for a coworker who’s pet duck had died (I know. It was weird.) I got them mixed up and wrote “I’m sorry about your duck” in the birthday card and “happy birthday” in the duck card,” wrote one user. “‘I’m sorry about your duck’ became the new ‘happy birthday’ in the department for like a year. Much to the poor duck ladies despair.”

Another said that one trick they’ve learned is to just sign “ditto” in the card under someone else’s comment.

Some comments recounted tales of success.

“My wife’s grandfather died and everyone signed a card to the grandmother. At first the family was shocked with what I wrote but it made her cry and hug me really big. ‘Congratulations! You now have your very own guardian angel who knows you better than anyone and will watch over you until the day you can be with him again,'” one user wrote.

Jonathan Zhou
Jonathan Zhou
Jonathan Zhou is a tech reporter who has written about drones, artificial intelligence, and space exploration.