Why Jamie Oliver Wants a Food Revolution

By Arwa Lodhi
Arwa Lodhi
Arwa Lodhi
May 20, 2015 Updated: May 20, 2015

He’s been a tireless campaigner for children’s health for ages, and now Jamie Oliver is calling for a full on Food Revolution. But what does that mean, in real, practical terms?

Not long ago, recipes were passed down through the generations. In some cultures–think Italy, Spain, Lebanon–this is still very much a part of the culture, and kids learn to cook by watching their relatives prepare meals. The often even participate! But in the West and other globalised countries, fast food has taken over, and many kids grow up eating pre-packed, microwavable food, and if they ever learn to cook, it involves baking junk food. No wonder there’s an obesity crisis in the West! 

British Celebrity Chef Jamie Oliver. (Scott Barbour/Getty Images)
British Celebrity Chef Jamie Oliver. (Scott Barbour/Getty Images)

Given that most parents today are either too busy to cook or actually don’t even know how to, Oliver’s global campaign focuses on putting compulsory food education on the school curriculum. It’s a brilliant idea: so many of us are unaware of what to eat for good health. 

Oliver wants to teach kids how to cook, what to cook, and how they can take better care not only of their own bodies, but those of their own children, when they have them. The best way to do this, he argues, is to force governments to teach not only history, maths and English, but cooking and nutrition too. He has his own Food Revolution TV show and has launched Food Revolution Day to take place every May 15th, but even beyond that date, you can help him meet his goal by sending out any food related tweets with the hashtag #FoodRevolutionDay, and signing his petition, here.

This article was originally published on www.eluxemagazine.com. Read the original here.
Arwa Lodhi