We’re All Connected

Each of us has something to give, and it is essential we do so
By Donna Martelli
Donna Martelli
Donna Martelli
Formerly a professional dancer with the Harkness Ballet of New York, has written three books, course manuals, book summaries, blogs, articles, and devotionals. Donna writes out of her own varied life experiences, including those of dancer, instructor, file clerk, business owner, real estate salesperson, wife, and mother. Her goal in writing is to bless and help people reach their full potential in this life. She lives in Indianapolis, Indiana, is married with five children and twelve grandchildren. She is the author of “When God Says Drop It” and “Why the Dance."
October 3, 2021 Updated: October 3, 2021

Every one of us is gifted in some manner and that gift or talent enables us to help others. Some people are great at giving wise advice, while others have unique knowledge and insight into various situations. Some people have so much faith that they always expect the best, and others have healing souls. Some of us are great readers of people, and we know if what they say is true or false.

There are those who seem to always live a life of miracles. I know of a family who may have a low income, but travel all over the world singing and dancing. They live in a creepy old house, but their parents passed it on to them mortgage-free. They lack nothing. Their four children are the same: They do all sorts of travel and activities that the average middle-class person can’t afford. I don’t know how that’s possible other than to say it must be miraculous. 

Though we have different abilities, we all contribute to the whole. People thrive through cooperation and sharing their unique talents. If any of those talents were missing, everyone would be lacking some degree of wholeness.

We fit together, yet no two of us are alike. People are diverse, yet the whole of humanity needs each one of us. It’s like our physical body: It has many parts, and each part has its particular function, essential to the whole. 

What if your foot told your hand that it’s not part of your body because it isn’t a hand? What if your ear said, “I don’t belong to the body because I’m not an eye?” If your whole body was an eye, how would you hear anything, and if your entire body was an ear, how could you see, smell, walk, or use your hands? That whole analogy sounds ludicrous, but it illustrates that we’re all connected.

Some parts of our body seem obscure, but they have significant importance. For example, we don’t think much about our many internal organs. We generally take them for granted and expect them to carry out their work behind the scenes. However, if one of them should malfunction, we give it our full attention. We do what we need to do to fix it and get it back to doing its regular job again. We care for all our body parts because each one is crucial.

If one part of your body suffers, all the other parts suffer with it. Have you ever had a muscle spasm in your back? It makes your legs hurt, while your neck and shoulders tighten as they try to help the situation. It can even make you feel nauseous.

If one part is powerful, the others benefit from it. When your back is strong and aligned as it should be, your digestive system, lungs, heart, and nerves are free and able to function with joy and peace.

We’re all connected, and each of us is a part of the other. Some of us are leaders, and others are valuable assistants who can see what needs to be done next. Many of us are excellent followers. Many of us can teach others the truth and direct them in the right way.

We must operate in the abilities and talents that we have and not try to do the work that somebody else is supposed to do.

Be assured that your part is essential to the whole. If you don’t already know what your talents are, search for your gifts and be yourself as you use them to contribute to society. It’s vital, so I say again, “Be yourself!” The world needs what you have to offer.

Formerly a professional dancer with the Harkness Ballet of New York, has written three books, course manuals, book summaries, blogs, articles, and devotionals. Donna writes out of her own varied life experiences, including those of dancer, instructor, file clerk, business owner, real estate salesperson, wife, and mother. Her goal in writing is to bless and help people reach their full potential in this life. She lives in Indianapolis, Indiana, is married with five children and twelve grandchildren. She is the author of “When God Says Drop It” and “Why the Dance."