Tips to Stay Well When Facing the Year’s Biggest Daily Temperature Changes

Exploring Solar Terms: ‘White Dew’ ( September 7–21)
September 3, 2020 Updated: September 3, 2020

A solar term is a period of about two weeks and is based on the sun’s position in the zodiac. Solar terms form the traditional Chinese calendar system. The calendar follows the ancient Chinese belief that living in accordance with nature will enable one to live a harmonious life. This article series explores each of the year’s 24 solar terms, offering guidance on how to best navigate the season.

Solar Term: White Dew

2020 Date: September 7–21

“White Dew” is the 15th solar term and typically holds the single largest daily temperature changes. It begins when the sun reaches the celestial longitude of 165 degrees and ends when it reaches the longitude of 180 degrees. Although it is already the 3rd solar term in the autumn, the heat within earth still remains strong while Yin energy is taking over. The result is a dramatic drop in temperature between day and night.

During this solar term, birds begin to adapt for the season. Wild geese and swallows begin to migrate southward while other birds stock their hoards in preparation for winter.

For the crops that can be grown in both spring and autumn, like rice, it’s their time to yield. If it rains, the crops may be damaged and unable to ripen or be properly harvested. The name of this solar term describes air vapors that have condensed into white dew overnight. It’s the ideal amount of water for crops during this solar term.

According to traditional Chinese medicine, our lungs and skin correspond to each other, as the lungs and our pores both release air and moisture. Because of this, they’re both sensitive to the temperature changes that mark this solar term. And the results are similar, we tend to have irritated skin or respiratory systems due to the frequent and significant changes in temperatures during White Dew.

The lungs are called “tender organs” in traditional Chinese medicine because they are fragile and dislike when the weather is either too hot or too cold. The lungs are closely linked with our immune system, thus taking good care of them and the respiratory system is particularly important in the pandemic season.

Living in Harmony With White Dew

  1. Protect your neck, nose, and mouth by covering them up in the early morning.
  2. Press firmly into the acupressure point “Qu-Chi” (Pool at the Bend, number LI11). It is at the end of the joint line when we bend our elbows to our upper arms. It also helps those with skin problems, such as dry or sensitive skin, pigmentation, acne, and so on.
  3. Press firmly into the acupressure point “Tan-Zhong,” which is in the center of the chest, between the nipples. It can help with congested lungs, coughing, or shortness of breath. You can also use a hair blow dryer to warm the point.
  4. Consider getting moxibustion treatments, as the heat can repel the chill hidden in our bodies and be preserved for an energetic start in the coming spring.
  5. Deep cleanse by inhaling warm steam, with or without essential oils, which helps to loosen up and dilute congestion inside our respiratory system and can help rinse our cells and tissues.
  6. Burn essential oils near the front door of the house to purify the air we bring in from outdoors. This can also help to calm and balance our senses each time we go in or out.

Seasonal Foods and Scents

Foods to Eat:

Chicken, walnut, yogurt, onion, ginkgo berry, potato, pear, tofu, mushroom, coconut, and eggs. Avoid deep-fried foods, pickles, shellfish, and chiles.

Essential Oils to Use:

Chamomile, niaouli, eucalyptus, cypress, pine, jasmine, frankincense, peppermint, neroli, and rosalina

Epoch Times contributor Moreen Liao is a descendant of four generations of traditional Chinese medicine doctors. She is also a certified aromatherapist, former dean of the New Directions Institute of Natural Therapies in Sydney, and the founder of Ausganica, a certified organic cosmetic brand. Visit Ausganica.com