Do Raspberries Improve Fertility?

By Zachary Stieber
Zachary Stieber
Zachary Stieber
Reporter
Zachary Stieber covers U.S. news, including politics and court cases. He started at The Epoch Times as a New York City metro reporter.
August 27, 2013 Updated: July 18, 2015

Building on a study last year that showed consuming more micronutrients improves sperm counts, a fertility nutritionist said that raspberries boost fertility and are “a perfect snack for couples trying to conceive.”

Researchers at the U.S. Department of energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) found last year that a healthy intake of micronutrients–such as vitamin C, E, folate, and zinc–helps boost sperm DNA quality in older men.

“This means that men who are at increased risk of sperm DNA damage because of advancing age can do something about it. They can make sure they get enough vitamins and micronutrients in their diets or through supplements,” said Andy Wyrobek of Berkeley Lab’s Life Sciences Division in a statement.

Now Juliet Wilson, a leading fertility nutritionist in the United Kingdom, tells the Daily Mail that eating one portion of raspberries provides the same Vitamin C as eating 173 grapes, and that raspberries should be considered alongside other “super-food” berries.

“Alongside their many health benefits, raspberries are a perfect snack for couples trying to conceive,” she said. Together with their high vitamin C content – one portion of raspberries provides the same amount as 173 grapes – they are also a good source of folate, which is known to be essential in key stages of female fertility and early embryo development. Raspberries provide essential nutrients that are known to enhance fertility in men and women.”

Raspberries have the lowest GI of any fruit, which means the sugar is absorbed into the body slowly.

Wyrobek says that more research is needed to explore the specific fertility benefits of micronutrients.

“Our research points to a need for future studies to determine whether increased antioxidant intake in older fathers will improve fertility, reduce risks of genetically defective pregnancies, and result in healthier children.”

Zachary Stieber
Zachary Stieber
Reporter
Zachary Stieber covers U.S. news, including politics and court cases. He started at The Epoch Times as a New York City metro reporter.