Born in the Year of the Rabbit?

January 28, 2011 Updated: October 1, 2015

YEAR OF THE RABBIT: Children take part in an early Chinese New Year performance at a shopping mall in Hong Kong on Jan. 25. 2011 marks the coming Year of the Rabbit according to the Chinese Lunar Calendar. (Mike Clarke/AFP/Getty Images)
YEAR OF THE RABBIT: Children take part in an early Chinese New Year performance at a shopping mall in Hong Kong on Jan. 25. 2011 marks the coming Year of the Rabbit according to the Chinese Lunar Calendar. (Mike Clarke/AFP/Getty Images)
Those of you lucky enough be to born in the year of the rabbit, that is, those of you born in 1927, 1939, 1951, 1963, 1975, 1987, 1999 or 2011, share, according to the Chinese, these admirable traits:

Creative, Compassionate, and Sensitive

Occupying the fourth position in the Chinese Zodiac, the Rabbit is creative, compassionate, and sensitive. Rabbits are friendly, outgoing, and prefer the company of others to be alone. They also prefer to avoid conflict. In confrontational situations, Rabbits approach the matter calmly and take into consideration the other party. Rabbits believe strongly in friends and family and if they lack these bonds, it may lead to emotional issues.

Sophisticated, Courteous, and Stylish

Although Rabbits are most comfortable being home, (their homes are always neat and organized and tend to be conservatively decorated) and that home is where they prefer to entertain, they are also sophisticated, expressive, well-behaved, and stylish. In fact, those born under the sign of the rabbit enjoy learning about cultural issues and about people from other countries.

Good Communicators

Rabbits are articulate and good communicators. Friends and acquaintances seek out their advice. This is why Rabbits make excellent diplomats and politicians. Other good careers for Rabbits include: writing, publishing, acting, fashion designing, the healing arts, administrating and in public relations, and teaching.

Generous

Rabbits are very sexually-orientated, but tend to give more of themselves than they should. This can lead to unrealistic expectations and unhealthy situations. Rabbits need partners who won’t take advantage of their giving nature. Such pairings will be strong. The Rabbit is most compatible with the Pig and Dog. They are usually incompatible with the Rooster and Rat.

On the Timid Side

Their serene nature keeps Rabbits from becoming visibly upset. This same quality sometimes leads them to be taken advantage of. Their sensitive nature makes them shy away from aggressive or competitive situations. Overall they are conservative and not interested in taking risks.

Rabbits should work at building more self-confidence and self-worth so they can feel more secure. The desire for remaining in safe, comfortable environments keeps Rabbits from taking risks which sometimes causes them to miss out on good opportunities.

A Bit Nervous

Even though Rabbits don’t usually get visibly upset or stressed, they do tend to keep these feelings inside. When they don’t express these feelings, they can cause Rabbits to become ill. Rabbits could benefit from more everyday activity that would reduce their stress levels and better their health.