Ajo Blanco

By Kevin Revolinski
Kevin Revolinski
Kevin Revolinski
Kevin Revolinski is an avid traveler, craft beer enthusiast, and home-cooking fan. He is the author of 15 books, including “The Yogurt Man Cometh: Tales of an American Teacher in Turkey” and his new collection of short stories, “Stealing Away.” He’s based in Madison, Wis., and his website is TheMadTraveler.com
August 12, 2021 Updated: August 12, 2021

Sometimes called white gazpacho, ajo blanco is defined by almonds and garlic. One must first peel the papery skin off the almonds, something a good blanching followed by a chilled bath makes possible.

Serves 6

  • 8 ounces stale bread, without crusts
  • 8 ounces blanched Spanish (Marcona) almonds
  • 2 to 4 garlic cloves
  • 1 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 to 3 tablespoons good quality sherry vinegar
  • 3 cups cold water
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt, or to taste
  • Peeled and de-seeded grapes, peeled chopped apples, and/or chopped melon for garnish

Roughly chop the bread and soak in water for 10 minutes. Drain.

Mash the almonds, garlic, bread, and salt in a mortar and pestle or food processor until you obtain a very fine paste. Add the olive oil gradually, until you obtain the consistency of a mayonnaise. Season with vinegar and thin with cold water.

Serve garnished with fresh fruit of choice. Summer days never tasted so good.

Recipe from María Llamas and Alambique Cooking School in Madrid

Kevin Revolinski
Kevin Revolinski
Kevin Revolinski is an avid traveler, craft beer enthusiast, and home-cooking fan. He is the author of 15 books, including “The Yogurt Man Cometh: Tales of an American Teacher in Turkey” and his new collection of short stories, “Stealing Away.” He’s based in Madison, Wis., and his website is TheMadTraveler.com