3-Berry Jam

By Victoria de la Maza
Victoria de la Maza
Victoria de la Maza
Victoria de la Maza is an award-winning cookbook author, columnist, and international TV host. Passionate about great food, she combines American traditions with her European heritage to create classic-with-a-twist recipes and ideas for stylish entertaining at home.
June 14, 2021 Updated: June 14, 2021

The beauty of this jam is the quickness of both making it and—happily—eating it. You’ll see.

I use blueberries, strawberries, and raspberries for this version, but the same method applies to a single-fruit jam or a combination of others, such as blackberries or gooseberries. I like adding strawberries, as they hold their shape slightly better and give the jam thickness. Blueberries are good for their color, and raspberries for their texture.

The general principle is 1 pound of fruit for 1 cup of sugar. I then add lemon, orange, and lime zest; a few tablespoons of each citrus juice; and a pinch of salt to bring out the sweetness of the fruit. Then it simmers gently until slightly soft. That’s that—simple, easy, and full of flavor: summer in a jar.

This jam is looser and runnier than the kind you’d find at the store. It’s just as delicious served as a spread on top of English muffins, a filling for cakes and tarts, and a sauce to drizzle over vanilla ice cream.

Makes about 6 cups

  • 2 pounds mixed berries (such as blueberries, raspberries, and strawberries)
  • 2 cups white granulated sugar
  • 1 tablespoon grated lemon zest
  • 1 tablespoon grated orange zest
  • 1 tablespoon grated lime zest
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon orange juice
  • 1 tablespoon lime juice
  • 1/8 teaspoon sea salt

Hull and quarter the strawberries.

In a saucepan, mix together the berries and sugar—stir well to combine. Add the citrus zests, juices, and salt. Let it sit for about 20 minutes or until the fruit releases some juices.

Set over low heat and cook until the sugar dissolves and the fruit is barely soft, which should take about 20 minutes. The jam is ready when the juices coat the back of a spoon. It’ll thicken as it cools.

Remove from the heat and pour into clean glass jars, leaving about 1/4 inch from the rim, as the jam will expand when cool. Cover the jars and chill or freeze.

Victoria de la Maza
Victoria de la Maza
Victoria de la Maza is an award-winning cookbook author, columnist, and international TV host. Passionate about great food, she combines American traditions with her European heritage to create classic-with-a-twist recipes and ideas for stylish entertaining at home.