Man Sends Wife Love Letter Before Dying From COVID-19: ‘We Had Our Time and It Was Wonderful’

December 29, 2020 Updated: December 29, 2020

A husband from Texas spent his final moments penning a moving goodbye note, emailing it to his wife of 21 years before passing away from the CCP virus in hospital.

Billy Loredo, 45, sent the love letter to his wife, Sonya Kypuros, before losing his battle at McAllen Medical Center in Texas. He tested positive for the CCP (Chinese Communist Party) virus, commonly known as the novel coronavirus, in mid-November and was admitted to hospital on Thanksgiving.

According to his obituary, he died on Dec. 13.

Epoch Times Photo
Billy Loredo (Courtesy of Sonya Kypuros)

“I want you to know that I am fighting very hard every day for my life,” Billy’s note began. “I do it for you so that I can see you again. You are the most important person in my life and I miss you every day.”

Billy’s brother, Dr. Pedro Loredo, told Good Morning America that Billy’s last missive was bittersweet.

“[Sonya] got to receive her last love letter from my little brother, and that breaks her heart in pieces,” he said. Billy was intubated shortly after sending the letter, in which he acknowledged that he was “not always the perfect man” but pledged to do his best.

Epoch Times Photo
Billy and his wife, Sonya Kypuros, on their wedding day (Courtesy of Sonya Kypuros)

His wife, he said, had always been perfect in his eyes.

“If I make it through this I promise to be a better man, in God, in life, and as a husband,” Billy wrote. “You have always deserved the best and [if] I get a second chance I will do it.

“If I don’t make it,” he continued, “I want you to know that I lived a happy wonderful life with you and would never have traded it for all the riches in the world.”

Epoch Times Photo
(Courtesy of Sonya Kypuros)

Billy, an attorney who worked at Edinburgh, started his law firm a few years ago. He was described by his brother as a humble, positive man. “Billy was just a great individual,” Dr. Loredo claimed. “He set seeds in people’s hearts and they just grew. I’m going to miss his laughter; you could hear that laughter coming down the hall.”

It is believed that Billy contracted the virus on Nov. 16 from his secretary who herself showed mild symptoms. The two work in adjacent offices and according to Dr. Loredo, she had come in and told Billy that she showed signs of some allergies, after which Billy asked her to get it checked immediately. She tested positive for the virus and so did Billy.

Sonya too was tested positive but she was more worried about her husband.

“He started to have mild symptoms,” Sonya told KWES-TV. “Like he would have a fever at night, but not all day long … it just turned quickly south from one moment to the next. He woke up early on Thanksgiving telling me that he was having breathing problems.”

Epoch Times Photo
(Courtesy of Sonya Kypuros)

Hospital policy prohibited Sonya from being with her husband after his intubation, so she thus spoke to Billy via FaceTime instead.

“I kept telling him that he would be OK, that he would get through this and that he would come back to me,” Sonya recalled. “It’s just awful that I couldn’t be there to hold his hand.”

According to his brother, Billy had no underlying health conditions.

Epoch Times Photo
(Courtesy of Sonya Kypuros)

Sonya has shared her husband’s moving letter to remind people that the CCP virus is still dangerous.

Billy’s final sentiment exemplified his love and care for the wife he was leaving behind.

“I also want you to be happy and continue to live your life without me and with no regrets,” Billy wrote. “We had our time and it was wonderful. I love you and miss you very much. I will keep fighting. Love, Billy.”

On reading his final words, Sonya considered: “I think he was trying to give me permission to be happy without him.”

“That was hard to read. But he took care of me and took care of everyone, so I’m not surprised he wrote that,” she added.

Epoch Times Photo
(Courtesy of Sonya Kypuros)

We would love to hear your stories! You can share them with us at emg.inspired@epochtimes.nyc.