Hong Kong Man Commits Suicide After Stabbing Policeman

By Nicole Hao
Nicole Hao
Nicole Hao
Nicole Hao is a Washington-based reporter focused on China-related topics. Before joining the Epoch Media Group in July 2009, she worked as a global product manager for a railway business in Paris, France.
July 3, 2021 Updated: July 3, 2021

A 50-year-old Hong Kong man stabbed a policeman in the back and then killed himself on July 1, the 24th anniversary of the city’s handover from Britain to the Chinese regime.

The next day, a large number of Hong Kong people mourned the deceased as the regime designated him as a “lone wolf” and criticized his sympathizers.

China affairs experts told The Epoch Times they don’t agree with the man’s extreme action, but sympathize with him.

Many Hongkongers are extremely angry and desperate like the deceased attacker because “their anti-extradition law protest was suppressed [in 2019]. Since then, they have lost more and more freedom. Recently, the [pro-democracy] Apply Daily was forced to close. Hongkongers’ anger and sorrow have hit the roof,” said Prof. Feng Chongyi, a China expert at the University of Technology in Sydney, Australia.

The experts expressed their wishes that the international community can help Hongkongers by putting more pressure on the Chinese regime.

The Stabbing Death

On July 1, some Hongkongers protested against the Chinese Communist Party’s rule in the streets as others celebrated the regime taking over the city 25 years ago. In the evening, the stabbing happened outside the Sogo department store in Causeway Bay.

At about 10:05 p.m. local time, a middle-aged man dressed in a black T-shirt, black pants, black shoes, and carrying a black backpack, suddenly stabbed a policeman in his back. The man then pierced the knife into his chest.

The policeman is a 28-year-old who suffered a 10-centimeter wound on the left side of his back and received surgery to repair a punctured lung at the hospital. The attacker was also sent to the hospital but died about one hour later at 11:20 p.m.

Epoch Times Photo
A policeman is lying on the ground after being stabbed on his back in Hong Kong on July 1, 2021. (Provided to The Epoch Times by Bai Ying)

The deceased’s employer, a Hong Kong beverage company named Vitasoy, stated in the night that the man was the company’s Purchasing Director Leung Kin-Fai, and has a family in Hong Kong.

On July 2, a large number of Hongkongers brought white flowers, joss sticks, and candles to mourn the attacker in Causeway Bay, but police didn’t allow the get-together and ordered them to leave.

Hong Kong Secretary for Security Chris Tang announced on Friday that the man was “radicalised” based on materials found on his computer, without providing further detail. Meanwhile, four Hong Kong police associations co-stated that there were netizens who glorified Leung and encouraged other people to follow in his action.

Epoch Times Photo
A child is detained by police officers on the 24th anniversary of Hong Kong’s handover from Britain in the Causeway Bay district in Hong Kong on July 1, 2021. (Anthony Kwan/Getty Images)

Dilemma

China affairs experts all expressed their concerns about Hongkongers’ dilemma. Hongkongers used to enjoy freedom of speech, freedom of assembly, and rule of law. Now, they will be arrested and sentenced if they don’t follow the Beijing regime.

“The death even on July 1 shows Hongkongers’ desperation. [Leung] must feel completely hopeless about Hong Kong’s future,” Li Hengqing, a scholar at the Washington Institute for Information and Strategy, told The Epoch Times. “Freedom and the rule of law are removed entirely out of Hong Kong.”

The Hong Kong regime didn’t approve any anti-communist rallies and parades on the past July 1, which was the first time in Hong Kong’s history and contrary to two years ago.

On June 16, 2019, nearly 2 million Hongkongers—representing almost 29 percent of the population—dressed in black flooded the city’s streets, calling for the government to withdraw a controversial extradition bill.

The Hong Kong authorities finally dropped the extradition bill in September 2019, but the Beijing regime launched the Hong Kong National Security Law on June 30, 2020. Since then, a large number of pro-democracy activists have been arrested in Hong Kong, and pro-democracy media have been facing their hardest times.

Epoch Times Photo
Police officers use tape to cordon off areas on the 24th anniversary of Hong Kong’s handover from Britain in the Causeway Bay district in Hong Kong on July 1, 2021. (Anthony Kwan/Getty Images)

“Facing hopelessness, some Hongkongers choose to leave. We know that over 100,000 Hongkongers left the city in the past two months,” Li continued. “The people who can’t leave or who don’t want to leave may behave extremely like Leung.”

Feng urged Hongkongers to calm down.

“You saw that the peaceful protests didn’t have an effective impact, but the murders and suicides have no effect at all,” Feng said. “The solution [I suggest] is urging the international community to help. When more democratic countries and more people from the world recognize the evil of the Chinese Communist Party regime, they will stand up to stop the evil.”

Nicole Hao
Nicole Hao
Nicole Hao is a Washington-based reporter focused on China-related topics. Before joining the Epoch Media Group in July 2009, she worked as a global product manager for a railway business in Paris, France.