Food

Smoky Oregano Black Beans

The smokiness of these black beans comes from dry roasting cumin and coriander seeds with oregano. It results in a distinctive, balanced and tasty dish
BY Andrea Hayley-Sankaran TIMEAugust 20, 2022 PRINT

The smokiness of these black beans comes from dry roasting cumin and coriander seeds with oregano.

The smell of the spices as its gentle smoke reaches your nose is absolutely divine, like the smell of freshly tanned leather. There are high spice notes from the sweet coriander, earthiness from the cumin, and a complex herbaceous scent from the oregano.

Oregano is a wonderful undertone for black beans. It serves to pull out, and enhance, some of the subtle, naturally-sweet flavors of the beans and the tomatoes. In this recipe, we also add garlic, onion, bay leaf, black pepper, and lime juice, for a delightfully fresh, balanced taste.

Epoch Times Photo
(Courtesy of Buttered Veg)

I hope you find this recipe distinctive, yet familiar, and that you give it a try. It is so easy to make too. Just remember to prepare a day in advance by soaking your dry black beans. After that, you are set. While the beans simmer away on the stove, you can be doing something else.

This recipe is a perfect opportunity to learn to cook beans from scratch if you haven’t already.

The process of cooking from scratch is very rewarding. It is also super inexpensive and tasty compared to the canned option. For a reference on cooking beans from scratch, please see my guide.

However, if you are short on time, and you prefer to use canned beans for this recipe, I give instructions for this in the notes below and you can complete this recipe in 30 minutes.

Black beans in a bowl
(Courtesy of Buttered Veg)
black beans and herbs in a pot
(Courtesy of Buttered Veg)

Black Beans

Black beans are a special bean, because they have a warming effect on the body. This makes them perfect to have during the cold season. They will help keep your insides warm.

One cup of beans is also a nutritional powerhouse, containing 15 grams of protein, 15 grams of fiber, and significant amounts of folate, copper, manganese, Vitamin B1, magnesium, phosphorus, and iron.

Black beans, given their black color, are actually the highest source of antioxidants in the bean kingdom. Eating these beans will help to combat free radicals, reduce inflammation, and protect against chronic disease.

Black Beans With …

These black beans are yummy with basmati or jasmine rice, or with tortilla, tacos, or burritos. You could also add extra water, and enjoy it as a black bean soup with a dollop of sour cream on top.

If you want to embellish it, it would be very good with cheddar cheese, or with avocado garnish.

Along with it, something like roasted butternut squash, or any roasted vegetable on the side, would be perfect.

This recipe makes a lot. Like any bean or lentil dish, Smoky Oregano Black Beans freeze up really well. Make portions for future dinners and keep them for a rainy day.

This is one of the keys to ensuring that you have home-cooked food to eat on a regular basis.

Smoky Oregano Black Beans
(Courtesy of Buttered Veg)

Recipe for Smoky Oregano Black Beans

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 35 minutes
Total Time: 45 minutes
Servings: 6 servings
Calories: 255KCAL

Ingredients

1 tablespoon avocado oil
4 cloves garlic, minced
1 cup onion, finely diced
2 bay leaves
4 15.5-ounce cans black beans
1 ½ cups cold water
1 ½ teaspoons cumin seeds, (sub with 1 teaspoon cumin powder)
1 ½ teaspoons coriander seed, (sub with 1 teaspoon coriander powder)
2 teaspoons dried oregano
1 teaspoon Himalayan pink salt
1 teaspoon black pepper
1 ½ cups diced tomatoes or canned tomato puree, (15.5-ounce can)
½ fresh lime, juiced
2 tablespoons fresh cilantro leaf, minced

Instructions

Step 1: Start the Black Beans
Add a tablespoon of oil to a large saucepan on medium heat. Add garlic, onion, bay leaves, and a pinch of salt, and saute until lightly browned. Meanwhile, open the cans of black beans. Drain and rinse beans once, then add to the saucepan with 1 ½ cups cold water. Bring to a boil, and then reduce the heat to a gentle simmer. Cook 10 minutes, partially covered.

Step 2: Prepare the Spices
Meanwhile, place a small skillet on medium-low heat. Add cumin and coriander seeds, and stir continuously until evenly browned and aromatic. Add dried oregano and stir well until aromatic. Turn off the heat. Wait 5 minutes to allow the spices to cool, then grind them in an electric spice grinder reserved for spices. (*If you don’t have a spice grinder, heat only the dried oregano, and use powdered cumin and coriander.)

Add spices to beans, along with salt, black pepper, and tomatoes. Simmer for 20 minutes. Add more water if needed to keep the beans covered and adjusted to your desired consistency.

STEP 3: Finish the Flavors
Finish with fresh lime, cilantro, salt, and pepper to taste.

To Serve
Garnish Smoky Black Beans with a dollop of sour cream or avocado.
Serve with long grained white rice, or as part of a meal, with tortilla, tacos, burritos, or salad, or thin it out with water and enjoy as a soup.
Keep leftovers in the fridge up to 5 days. It also freezes well for up to 2 months.

Notes
Make This in the Instant Pot!
Soak 2 cups dry black beans for 6 hours, or overnight. Drain, and rinse a couple of times. Place beans in the Instant Pot with 3 ½ cups cold water. Add garlic, onion, bay leaves, and a pinch of salt. Refer to Step 2 to prepare the spices. Add spices to the pot, then cover with the lid, set vent to “Sealing,” select “High Pressure,” and set the timer for 10 minutes. After the cooking time is up, wait 15 minutes and release any residual pressure before opening the lid safely. Continue with Step 3 and finish the flavors. Enjoy!

Nutrition
Calories: 255kcal | Carbohydrates: 48g | Protein: 15g | Fat: 1g | Sodium: 895mg | Potassium: 1180mg | Fiber: 12g | Sugar: 4g | Vitamin A: 125IU | Vitamin C: 11.6mg | Calcium: 135mg | Iron: 4.8mg

This article was originally published on butteredveg.com

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Andrea Hayley-Sankaran is the founder of Buttered Veg, the vegetarian food blog for conscious eaters. Andrea is a vegetarian chef (now a home cook) informed by over two decades of practice and experimentation with the ancient sciences of Ayurveda and Chinese Medicine. Andrea's study of traditional wisdom deepened her understanding of how to create incredibly flavorful vegetarian food that makes you feel good, inside and out. butteredveg.com
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