Shen Yun: Discipline and Unity of Orchestra, Colors of Joy, Laughter, and Magic

January 6, 2011 Updated: October 1, 2015

Nelson Happy at Lincoln Center's David H. Koch Theater following the Premiere of Shen Yun Performing Arts on Jan. 6, 2011. (Seth Holehouse/The Epoch Times)
Nelson Happy at Lincoln Center's David H. Koch Theater following the Premiere of Shen Yun Performing Arts on Jan. 6, 2011. (Seth Holehouse/The Epoch Times)
NEW YORK—The synchronization of the stringed instruments and the seamless blending of Western and traditional Chinese music by the Shen Yun Performing Arts Orchestra wowed attorney Nelson Happy at Thursday’s premier performance of the 2011 Shen Yun Performing Arts World Tour at the Lincoln Center.

“[The] Blending [of] the traditional Chinese music with the Western style is so perfectly executed that you don't think of it as a combination,” Happy observed. “It’s totally new.”

Happy’s friend, Tomaczek Bednarek, is a music composer and the Managing Director of Music and Production at Cinestage Media Group. Bednarek perceived grace, dignity, and a sensitive air within the voice of the instruments. Happy wondered at the way the music streamed forth from many strings as though from one violin.

“The discipline of the string section was the best I've ever heard, and they were playing as one instrument. In many ways, that's the most difficult part of an orchestra—it’s to get that total synchronization of all of the violins,” noted Happy.

As the unity of the orchestra amazed the two theatergoers; the variance and medley of colors onstage enthralled them nonetheless. Bednarek recalled the colors he says must have been inspired by flowers: “Oranges, reds, blues, yellows, deep passionate pinks and peaches, lavenders.”

“Tonight was the color of joy, the color of laughter, the color of magic. It was just a powerful moment. The color song and heart. That's the reason why everyone should go and see this piece,” concluded Bednarek.

The yearning for freedom in a communist China was not lost on Happy, who lives across from the Chinese consulate here in New York, where he says protesters gather almost daily.

He said he saw in Shen Yun“self-expression, which we enjoy in this country and think nothing about, but does not exist in so many other countries including China.”

Reporting by NTD Television and Tara MacIsaac.

Shen Yun Performing Arts will perform at Lincoln Center's David H. Koch Theater through Jan. 16. For more information, visit ShenYunPerformingArts.org