Photographer Sets Camera Trap to Capture Rusty-Spotted Cats, Leopards, Exotic Beasts in India

By Caters News Agency
Caters News Agency
Caters News Agency
August 13, 2021 Updated: August 13, 2021

An animal lover has captured big cats and other exotic animals using camera traps.

Photographer Gaurav Ramnaravanan took a host of pictures from various locations in farmlands and villages in the western Ghats and other parts of India.

The pictures show the striking spotted cats being caught by a camera trap—which are decked out in camouflage to get close-up shots of the animals.

Epoch Times Photo
An inquisitive leopard approaching the camera trap. (Courtesy of Caters News)
Epoch Times Photo
A leopard on a hill in broad daylight with a village in the background. (Courtesy of Caters News)

“The seemingly rural landscapes during the day become wildlife haunts at night,” said Gaurav, from Coimbatore, India.

“Big cats like leopards and tigers, small carnivores like rusty spotted cats, civets, and hyenas are all active after dusk and seeing them is close to impossible.

“The only way to document the elusive beings that inhabit these landscapes is by using camera traps to record their movement during the nights.”

Epoch Times Photo
A sloth bear tampering with the camera flash in broad daylight. (Courtesy of Caters News)
Epoch Times Photo
A rare and elusive rusty-spotted cat captured on camera. (Courtesy of Caters News)
Epoch Times Photo
A beautiful Bengal tiger made an appearance. (Courtesy of Caters News)

He adds, “Camera trapping not just helps to document what animals are there but also helps to raise awareness amongst the rural communities that live along to the periphery of these jungles to take precautionary measures and not venture out at night as the risk of coming into a fatal encounter with big cats.

“Camera trap photography of wildlife is the greatest game of patience.

“This is an art which goes beyond just creativity.

“Camera trapping involves a lot of DIY customization of housings, light cases, waterproofing, building electric circuits to increase longevity of the camera and flash batteries and so on.

“I conduct three-hour-long online camera-trap masterclasses every alternate month for a small group of four to eight people spread across two sessions on a weekend.”

Epoch Times Photo
Another sighting of the rare rusty-spotted cat. (Courtesy of Caters News)
Epoch Times Photo
A common nocturnal animal seldom seen in the day makes a camera trap the best way to capture it. (Courtesy of Caters News)
Epoch Times Photo
Mother and cub sloth bears against the backdrop of a starlit sky. (Courtesy of Caters News)
Epoch Times Photo
An elephant smashed one of Gaurav’s flashes. (Courtesy of Caters News)
Epoch Times Photo
Once the cameras are set up, Gaurav normally walks across to make sure it is working flawlessly and also that the lighting and camera settings are in order. (Courtesy of Caters News)

Epoch Times staff contributed to this report.

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Caters News Agency
Caters News Agency