Lori Loughlin, Husband to Plead Guilty in College Bribery Scheme

May 21, 2020 Updated: May 21, 2020

Actress Lori Loughlin and her fashion designer husband have agreed to plead guilty to their involvement in a college bribery scheme, according to court papers filed Thursday.

Loughlin, 55, and Mossimo Giannulli, 56, will plead guilty to conspiracy charges.

Correspondence obtained by federal agents showed the couple discussing how to get their two girls into the University of Southern California as athletic recruits despite the fact neither girl competed in the sport in question, rowing.

The scheme included posing for pictures on a rowing machine and falsifying their athletic history.

Prosecutors said the couple paid $500,000 to William “Rick” Singer, who ran a foundation he used to funnel money to college officials to get children of rich parents into various schools.

Singer pleaded guilty to several charges last year and has cooperated with federal agents.

Lori Loughlin and daughters
Isabella Giannulli, Lori Loughlin and Olivia Giannulli attend the Teen Choice Awards 2017 at Galen Center in L.A., Calif., on Aug. 13, 2017. (Frazer Harrison/Getty Images)

Both of Loughlin’s daughters were admitted to the school.

Loughlin will plead guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit wire and mail fraud. Giannulli will plead guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit wire and mail fraud and honest services wire and mail fraud.

Under the plea agreement, Loughlin will serve two months in prison and two years of supervised release. She’ll have to complete 100 hours of community service and pay a $150,000 fine.

Giannulli will serve five months in prison and two years of supervised release. He’ll have to complete 250 hours of community service and pay a $250,000 fine.

“These defendants will serve prison terms reflecting their respective roles in a conspiracy to corrupt the college admissions process and which are consistent with prior sentences in this case. We will continue to pursue accountability for undermining the integrity of college admissions,” Andrew Lelling, a U.S. attorney, said in a statement.

Follow Zachary on Twitter: @zackstieber