Left-Handers’ Day: Some Notable Lefties in History

By Jack Phillips
Jack Phillips
Jack Phillips
Breaking News Reporter
Jack Phillips is a breaking news reporter at The Epoch Times based in New York.
August 13, 2013 Updated: July 18, 2015

Happy Left-Handers’ Day–no, it’s fake not a holiday coined by Ned Flanders–is on Tuesday.

“All year round, we fit in with home and office layouts designed for right-handers’ comfort – put up with doors, cookers, sinks, computer mice, keyboards and desks that are efficient for right-handers to work at, and hundreds of times every day we contort ourselves using back-to-front tools and gadgets that make us look clumsy and awkward in our efforts to make them to work,” reads a statement on the Left-Handers’ Day website.

It added: “But NOT TODAY! Because on this special day, it is your chance to GET YOUR OWN BACK on your right-handed friends colleagues and family, by designating your personal space as a LEFTY ZONE.”

Some notable left-handers include Paul McCartney, Kurt Cobain, Marilyn Monroe, Michelangelo, Jimi Hedrix, and boxer Manny Pacquiao. Benjamin Franklin, Henry Ford, J.S. Bach, and M.C. Escher were also lefties.

And apparently, Alexander the Great, Joan of Arc, and Napoleon Bonaparte were also left-handed.

Four out of the last five presidents are left-handed. Former President George W. Bush is the only one who wasn’t.

A number of Twitter users posted about what it means to be left-handed.

“Left handed people always end up successful,” wrote one. 

“To my left-handed brothers and sisters, today is International Lefthanders Day!” wrote Pennsylvania Congressman Brian Sims.

Data shows that around the world, 10 percent of men and 12 percent of women are left-handed.

Jack Phillips
Jack Phillips
Breaking News Reporter
Jack Phillips is a breaking news reporter at The Epoch Times based in New York.