Aurora Borealis 2014 Pictures: Photos of Recent Northern Lights From Sweden, Iceland, UK, Space

By Zachary Stieber
Zachary Stieber
Zachary Stieber
Reporter
Zachary Stieber covers U.S. and world news. He is based in Maryland.
September 14, 2014 Updated: July 18, 2015

The auora borealis, or northern lights, has been hitting some parts of the world over the past couples days, thanks to a solar storm that was initially sent toward Earth due to a solar flare.

The phenomenon produces green lights in the sky, and is one of the most noted celestial wonders.

People across the world took their cameras outside and tried to capture great pictures.

NASA announced in the middle of the week that a significant solar flare sent a solar storm toward the Earth.

The flare was an X1.6 class, with X-class denoting the most intense flares while the number providers more information about its strenth.

“An X2 is twice as intense as an X1, an X3 is three times as intense, etc,” the space agency notes.

The aurora phenomenon was predicted to be visible in the northern United States, Europe, and Asia, the Space website said.

“The most intense storming is expected tomorrow, Friday night into Saturday morning,” William Murtagh, who heads the U.S. Space Weather Prediction Center n Boulder, Colorado, told Space.com.

Check out some below.

(Flickr/Mike Lewinski)
(Flickr/Mike Lewinski)

 

(Flickr/Mike Lewinski)
(Flickr/Mike Lewinski)

 

(Flickr/Francois Aizpuru)
(Flickr/Francois Aizpuru)

 

(Flickr/François Aizpuru)
(Flickr/François Aizpuru)

 

(Flickr/Paul Weber)
The aurora borealis over northern Sweden, taken in Umea, Vasterbotten. (Flickr/Paul Weber)

 

(Flickr/Lyndsay Esson)
(Flickr/Lyndsay Esson)

 

A photo from European astronaut Alexander Gerst, from the International Space Station, shows the recent aurora borealis, also known as the northern lights. (Alexander Gerst/Twitter)
A photo from European astronaut Alexander Gerst, from the International Space Station, shows the recent aurora borealis, also known as the northern lights. (Alexander Gerst/Twitter)

 

The aurora as seen from Portstewart Point in the United Kingdom (Flicker/John Purvis)
The aurora as seen from Portstewart Point in the United Kingdom (Flicker/John Purvis)
Zachary Stieber
Zachary Stieber covers U.S. and world news. He is based in Maryland.