How to Be a True Visionary

By Deborah Asseraf
Deborah Asseraf
Deborah Asseraf
Deborah Asseraf is founder & CEO of Popcorn Productions, a company that explodes awareness for businesses through tailored campaigns. Popcorn Productions produces exclusive events, video products and specialty products aimed at spreading the word through interactive environments. Loving every minute of being an Entrepreneur, Deborah started the Social Pulse, a blog devoted to addressing important, fun and educational issues for and about entrepreneurs, business owners and the buisiness savvy.
September 2, 2014 Updated: April 23, 2016

In one of Simon Sinek’s talks on leadership he famously quotes: “Directions are instructions given to explain how. Direction is a vision offered to explain why.”

What Simon means by this is that most business owners get so lost in day to day management that they forget to see the larger picture – the end goal and the reason they are working so hard to begin with. Odds are you have a dream of what you hope your business will look one day or maybe the way in which your company could impact the world we live in. The problem with dreams is that they always seem simpler than reality. So how do you strike that ideal balance between your direction and the nitty gritty of every day business?

Be Bold. It’s hard to march to your beat of the drums when everyone is dancing to another rhythm. But here’s the truth, it only takes one person to start a movement and one follower to spread the word. Instead of trying to convert everyone into a fan, concentrate on converting just one person to see the world the way that you do. Eventually, your message will start spreading by itself.

Don’t Talk, Preach. The main difference between talking and preaching is the key ingredient to your success: belief. The more you believe in your business and direction the easier it will be for others to see it as well. As always, present your vision with the benefits of your service or product. How is your business going to change the way in which your prospects goes in their life? It’s your belief that will also bring clarity in where you business is heading and what you need in order achieve success.

Walk Your Talk.  There is nothing that kills a vision faster than seeing someone who doesn’t practice what they preach. It’s like an environmentalist buying a hummer – no one is going to follow that guy. Make sure everything from your process to your service or product and brand are streamline with your direction. If your belief aligns with enough people then eventually it won’t matter what products you sell. A great example of this is, of course, Apple who is a computer company that also sells music devices, software and TV hardware. Something their competitors, like DELL, have never been able to accomplish.

It’s Still A Business.  Belief and direction are key but they’ll inevitable become fuzzy as day-to-day stress begins to creep in. Building a community around yourself, who values the same ideals and vision as you do, will help you ensure success. This is the key difference between being a leader and a manager; you want to train followers not employees. You want people who will come regardless of the paycheck because they believe just as strongly in your vision as you do. And, in order to achieve this, you need to build strong corporate culture around your beliefs and values. This allows everyone to be in sync and work together towards the same goal.

Interested in learning how to implement stronger office culture in your business? Email us at info@popcornprod.com.

Deborah Asseraf is founder & CEO of Popcorn Productions, a company that explodes awareness for businesses through tailored campaigns. Popcorn Productions produces exclusive events, video products and specialty products aimed at spreading the word through interactive environments. Loving every minute of being an Entrepreneur, Deborah started the Social Pulse, a blog devoted to addressing important, fun and educational issues for and about entrepreneurs, business owners and the buisiness savvy.