Headless Torso DNA Matched to Missing Woman Killed on Homemade Submarine

Police in Denmark have confirmed that the headless torso found floating in the waters near Copenhagen belongs to Kim Wall, a journalist who went missing after boarding a homemade submarine to interview its inventor on Aug. 10.

The torso was deliberately dismembered, police said.

Wall, a Columbia University-educated freelance journalist, was last seen on Aug. 10 aboard the private UC3 Nautilus submarine invented by Peter Madsen.

Wall’s boyfriend reported her missing early on Aug. 11. Later, the submarine was also reported missing, but rescue crews discovered it sinking 30 miles from Copenhagen after 10 a.m. on Aug. 11.

Members of The Danish Emergency Management Agency (DEMA) assist police at Kalvebod Faelled in Copenhagen on August 23, 2017 in search of missing bodyparts of Swedish journalist Kim Wall close to the site where her torso was found on August 21. (MARTIN SYLVEST/AFP/Getty Images)
Members of The Danish Emergency Management Agency (DEMA) assist police at Kalvebod Faelled in Copenhagen on Aug. 23, 2017, in search of missing remains of Swedish journalist Kim Wall close to the site where her torso was found on Aug. 21.
(Martyn Sylvest/AFP/Getty Images)

Madsen told the rescue crew that something had gone wrong inside the boat, but some now believe he was trying to sink the submarine to cover up evidence.

The submarine inventor first said that he had dropped Wall off on an island in Copenhagen, but later admitted that she died during an accident aboard the vessel.

Madsen told a court that he had dumped Wall’s body in the water, hours before the torso was discovered.

Police said the torso was entirely dismembered – missing its head, arms, and legs. A passing cyclist discovered it on Monday.

Allegedly Swedish journalist Kim Wall stands next to a man in the tower of the private submarine "UC3 Nautilus" on August 10, 2017 in Copenhagen Harbor.  (PETER THOMPSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Allegedly Swedish journalist Kim Wall stands next to a man in the tower of the private submarine UC3 Nautilus on Aug. 10, 2017 in Copenhagen Harbor. (Peter Thompson/AFP/Getty Images)

Divers recovered the torso and sent it for analysis and continued to search the area.

Wall was writing a story about Madsen and his submarine, but failed to return from an interview on the 60-foot vessel.

The submarine was the biggest of its kind when Madsen completed it in 2008. Wall was planning to sell her article to Wired, an American magazine.

Divers from the Danish Defence Command preparing for a dive in Koge Bugt near Amager in Copenhagen on August 22, 2017 where a woman torso was found yesterday.      A Swedish journalist, Kim Wall, went missing after going sailing with the submarine, UC3 Nautilus, on August 10. (LISELOTTE SABROE/AFP/Getty Images)
Divers from the Danish Defence Command preparing for a dive in Koge Bugt near Amager in Copenhagen on August 22, 2017 where a woman torso was found yesterday.
A Swedish journalist, Kim Wall, went missing after going sailing with the submarine, UC3 Nautilus, on August 10. (Liselotte Sabroe/AFP/Getty Images)

Wall was born in Sweden and received degrees in Columbia University and the London School of Economics.

She wrote articles on a range of topics for publications including New York Times, Time, Foreign Police, and the Guardian.

Reuters contributed to this report.

From NTD.tv

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