Gucci Taking Counterfeit Fight to Washington

By Caroline Dobson
Caroline Dobson
Caroline Dobson
September 27, 2010 Updated: October 1, 2015

A Gucci store in London, England. Giorgio Gucci, third generation of the Gucci dynasty, visited Washington for the first time to participate in the forum of Intellectual Property Rights in the Fashion Industry and Its Effects on Our Nation's Economy. (Scott Barbour/Getty Images)
A Gucci store in London, England. Giorgio Gucci, third generation of the Gucci dynasty, visited Washington for the first time to participate in the forum of Intellectual Property Rights in the Fashion Industry and Its Effects on Our Nation's Economy. (Scott Barbour/Getty Images)
Giorgio Gucci, third generation of the Gucci dynasty, visited Washington for the first time to participate in the forum of “Intellectual Property Rights in the Fashion Industry and Its Effects on Our Nation's Economy” hosted by the Greater Washington Fashion Chamber of Commerce.

"Survival in fashion is dependent on [designers] being able to produce creative, individual materials," said Rep. Diane Watson (D-Calif.), who represents the red carpet-rich constituency district that includes Hollywood.

The trade association that hosted the meeting represents Washington's fashion industry and Rep. Watson. Panelists discussed two bills being circulated in the U.S. House of Representatives and Senate that offer more protection through regulation that impact the production and distribution of counterfeit goods, including the present measures of U.S. agencies trying to tackle the trade and sale of such goods.

Gucci vehemently commented about the "terrible business [that is] ruining the economy … and promoting child slavery."

The Italian heir said, The people who are exploiting the work of others have no conscience.”