Canada in Brief, March 15-21

March 14, 2018 Updated: January 3, 2019

Alberta politicians unanimously back province in oil pipeline fight

Alberta politicians have passed a motion unanimously to back Premier Rachel Notley’s fight for the Trans Mountain pipeline.

The United Conservatives, Alberta Party, and Alberta Liberals joined with Notley’s NDP to back the government motion in support of the project, which would triple the amount of oil flowing from Edmonton to B.C.

The final tally was 700, with Notley and United Conservative Opposition Leader Jason Kenney in the chamber for the vote.

However, some politicians say they still have concerns with how Notley’s government is handling the battle with B.C. and dealing with Ottawa, which has jurisdiction over interprovincial pipelines.

Loblaw under fire for gift card ID requests

Loblaw Companies Ltd. isn’t providing details as to why some Canadians have been singled out with requests to hand over additional personal information to secure their $25 gift card related to the alleged bread price-fixing scandal.

Customer outrage has fomented online as Canadians take to Twitter to express privacy concerns about the company’s decision to ask some to provide a scan of their driver’s licence or utility bill in order to receive the card.

Some have also commented on the perceived irony of Loblaw’s apparent fraud prevention measure, given that the gift cards are a gesture of apology for deceiving the public.

Teens cause $20,000 damage at house party

What police are describing as an “uncontrolled” house party in West Vancouver has caused about $20,000 in damage after a teenaged girl rented the home online.

West Vancouver police say the owners of the house do not want to pursue criminal charges and the family of the girl who rented it has agreed to cover the cost.

Police say in a news release that they learned a 14-year-old girl had booked the home through the unauthorized use of a parent’s credit card.

Police say walls, furniture, and artwork were smashed and they are asking anyone who might be able to identify those directly responsible for the damage to contact them.

With files from The Canadian Press