50 Cent’s Cash Photos Posted on Instagram Prompts Judge to Call Him Back Into Court

February 20, 2016 Updated: February 21, 2016

50 Cent might be in trouble with the courts again.

A bankruptcy judge called the rapper—born Curtis Jackson—back into court after he was spotted on Instagram flaunting wads of cash. Recently, one of his photos (above) shows him sitting down along with what appears to be stacks of $100 bills spelling the word “BROKE.” He also recently bought a house in Africa, according to his Twitter account.

I’m concerned about allegations of nondisclosure and a lack of transparency in the case.
— Ann Nevins, Judge

Judge Ann Nevins, who is handling his bankruptcy case, wants him to explain some of the pictures and see if he’s been truthful about his current financial situation. 

 

“I’m concerned about allegations of nondisclosure and a lack of transparency in the case,” Judge Nevins told his lawyers during a hearing on Feb. 18, in Hartford, Connecticut, according to CNN.

She said, “There’s a purpose of having a bankruptcy process be transparent, and part of that purpose is to inspire confidence in the process.”

50’s legal team issued a statement, saying he would show up “to make sure that all questions have been addressed.”

“[He] has been forthcoming and transparent with all creditors,” his lawyers added

He declared bankruptcy in July 2015.

Donald Trump has filed bankruptcy. It means you’re reorganizing your finances, but it does stop things from moving forward that you don’t want moving forward.
— 50 Cent

“Walt Disney has filed bankruptcy. Donald Trump has filed bankruptcy. It means you’re reorganizing your finances, but it does stop things from moving forward that you don’t want moving forward,” 50 told E! News last year.

The day after declaring bankruptcy, he posted a photo on Instagram with the caption: “Times are hard out here LMAO,” along with a tiny Smart Car.

50 told TMZ earlier this month that his biggest creditors—Sleek Audio, SunTrust Bank and Lastonia Leviston—came up with a plan for him to pay the firms back. He said their plan violates the 13th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution that bans slavery and involuntary servitude.

His creditors’ plan would create “a near-indefinite period of involuntary indentured servitude” and he would only work for their benefit.

He added: “The plan conditions [50’s] access to food and shelter on the whims of the trustee, who answers only to the [creditors].” 

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