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Woman Claiming to be World’s Oldest Dies in Georgia

By Alex Johnston
Epoch Times Staff
Created: October 7, 2012 Last Updated: October 9, 2012
Related articles: World » International
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Georgian woman Antisa Khvichava blowing out candles on her cake during her 130th birthday party in the village of Sachino, some 370 km (230 miles) west of Tbilisi July 8, 2010. Khvichava is purported to be the oldest person in the world. (STRINGER/AFP/Getty Images)

Georgian woman Antisa Khvichava blowing out candles on her cake during her 130th birthday party in the village of Sachino, some 370 km (230 miles) west of Tbilisi July 8, 2010. Khvichava is purported to be the oldest person in the world. (STRINGER/AFP/Getty Images)

A woman who claimed to be the world’s oldest died in the Georgian village of Sachino, it was reported Sunday.

Antisa Khvichava claimed to be 132 years old, making her not only the oldest woman, but also the oldest person in the world. Radio Free Europe, citing local reports, reported she was born on July 8, 1880, based on her official documents.

However, many experts have disputed her claims and said she probably was not that old, according to the broadcaster. They said her documents were forged or simply incorrect.

L. Stephen Coles of the Gerontology Research Group told The Wall Street Journal in 2007 that if Khvichava’s records were true, it means she would have given birth to her youngest son at the age of 60. At the time, Georgia’s justice ministry verified her claims.

Khvichava, who purportedly lived through both World War I and World War II, said she was able to live so long by consuming 50 grams of grape “chacha,” a type of local alcohol after breakfast every day.

She had 12 grandchildren, 18 great-grandchildren, along with four great-great grandchildren.

The world’s oldest person is 116-year-old Besse Cooper of the U.S. state of Georgia. The oldest living man is Japan’s Jiroemon Kimura, who is 115.

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  • http://www.facebook.com/luka.tsulukidze.3 Luka Tsulukidze

    thats why i am proud my country Georgia. this is our genes


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