Winter Antiques Show Opens at Park Avenue Armory

January 20, 2011 Updated: October 1, 2015

ALASKAN MASK: This mask (circa 1890-1905) is on display at the Winter Antiques Show as part of the Donati collection. It was made in the Kuskokwim region of Alaska from wood, pigment, sinew, vegetal fiber, cotton thread, and replaced feathers.  (Amal Chen/The Epoch Times)
ALASKAN MASK: This mask (circa 1890-1905) is on display at the Winter Antiques Show as part of the Donati collection. It was made in the Kuskokwim region of Alaska from wood, pigment, sinew, vegetal fiber, cotton thread, and replaced feathers. (Amal Chen/The Epoch Times)
NEW YORK—The 57th Winter Antiques Show opens to the public today, featuring old favorites and newly uncovered wonders. Collectors, designers, or those just interested in a slice of history can view and buy the treasured finds displayed by 74 vendors at the Park Avenue Armory until Jan. 30.

The wide breadth of the show offers one a rare opportunity to admire a depiction of a Byzantine capital from the reign of Justinian in the sixth century and inspect the fine handiwork of American furniture makers and decorative artists from the 17th–19th centuries at the same venue.

The Carlton Rochell Asian Art adds an exotic flare to the exhibition with a rare Shiva figure in copper alloy from the 12th-century Chola Dynasty in India.

A Philadelphia Carved Mahogany Side Chair (circa 1768–1780) takes the spotlight at the Christopher T. Rebollo Antiques exhibit. The chair is attributed to the talented hands of James Gillingham, a well-known 18th-century cabinetmaker from Philadelphia. Another of his side chairs is in the White House collection.

In addition to viewing and acquiring the relics of a bygone era, attendees can learn from interior design experts about how to best display their treasures at home. A lecture series called the “Expert Eye” will run through the course of the show.

General admission tickets are $20 and include the show catalog. All ticket sales and sponsor donations will go to the East Side House Settlement, a non-profit organization that provides social services to South Bronx residents.