Watch: Once Every 10 to 20 Years a Rare ‘Superbloom’ Spreads Across the Mojave Desert

By Tara MacIsaac
Tara MacIsaac
Tara MacIsaac
Tara MacIsaac is an editor and reporter who has worked on a variety of topics over the course of her ten years with The Epoch Times, including science, the environment, and local New York news. She is currently working with The Epoch Times edition based in Southern California.
April 14, 2016 Updated: April 14, 2016

Usually the vegetation is sparse and hardy in the Mojave Desert, with just 2.36 inches of rain annually. But once every 10 to 20 years, a heavy winter rain drenches the desert and dormant wildflowers make a phenomenal appearance in what is known as a “superbloom.”

Mojave Desert’s Death Valley, the hottest and driest place on Earth, comes to life. 

Filmmaker Harun Mehmedinovic captures the jubilant Desert Gold flower, Geraea canescens, as it stretches up after a long slumber.

Mehmedinovic’s short film, “Amargosa Superbloom,” premiered on BBC Earth, and it is part of an ongoing crowd-funded SKYGLOW project to raise awareness about light pollution by capturing the beauty of the night sky.

For more of Mehmedinovic’s work, see his website www.BloodHoney.com or follow @modrac on Twitter. 

Tara MacIsaac
Tara MacIsaac
Tara MacIsaac is an editor and reporter who has worked on a variety of topics over the course of her ten years with The Epoch Times, including science, the environment, and local New York news. She is currently working with The Epoch Times edition based in Southern California.