Videos of the Day: Trump Arrives in Vietnam for Second Summit with Kim Jong Un

February 26, 2019 Updated: February 26, 2019

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President Donald Trump arrived in Vietnam on Tuesday for his second summit meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. The key focus of the meeting is denuclearization in North Korea.

President Donald Trump is greeted after arriving on Air Force One at Noi Bai International Airport, in Hanoi, Vietnam, on Feb. 26, 2019. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

At around 9 p.m. local time, Trump arrived in the Vietnamese capital of Hanoi. Kim arrived earlier that same day after a 2.5-day train trip through China.

Before departing for Hanoi, Trump said North Koreans could enjoy a great economic future if Kim follows through on his pledges about denuclearization.

The president said on Monday during a White House meeting with governors:
“I think it [North Korea] can be really one of the great financial and economic countries anywhere in the world … But you can’t do that if you’re going to keep nuclear.”

The two leaders will have a one-on-one meeting Wednesday evening. A series of meetings will be held the following day.

Vietnam has made many preparations for the summit: hanging flags, lights, and flower decorations.

Trump will stay at the JW Marriott Hotel for the two-day summit, many local residents have gathered there to welcome the president.

The first summit was held in Singapore back in June 2018. As a result of the meeting, Trump and Kim both signed a joint statement. Kim pledged to work toward complete denuclearization of the Korean peninsula.

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Border Wall Construction to Replace Old Fence in San Diego

trump at border
President Donald Trump (C) inspects border wall prototypes in San Diego, Calif., on March 13, 2018. (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)

In San Diego, approximately 90 feet of secondary border fencing has been built to replace an old fence. It’s an update agents say was desperately needed, in part, to keep up with modern tools.

The new 30-foot-high steel wall will replace the existing 16-foot stamp steel mesh fencing, which Border Patrol Agent Theron Francisco says was regularly breached, “It can be cut and people can get through in about 30 seconds. In the 90s those types of tools weren’t readily available like they are now.”

Customs and Border Protection said on Feb. 22, 2019, border-wall prototypes will be torn down to make way for a secondary barrier construction at San Diego, Calif., on Oct. 26, 2017. (AP Photo/Elliott Spagat)

“The secondary fence until now, it would get cut almost on a daily basis, in the last three years, we average over 1500 cuts in that three-year-time period. It was almost average a cut a day,” said Border Patrol Agent Francisco.

The new secondary fence is 14 miles long—that is 1.5 miles longer than the fence it’s replacing and about 14 feet taller. It’s also six feet deep.

Graphic shows existing border fence and barriers built and apprehensions by border sector in 2017. (image via AP)

Francisco says the new infrastructure will prevent alien smugglers from cutting the fence and getting across the border.

There are two layers of fencing along the U.S.-Mexico border in San Diego, Calif. Construction to build the 30-foot tall steel wall began on Feb. 18, 2019. It was just days after Trump declared a national emergency over border security.

Construction firm SLSCO Ltd. of Texas won the $101 million contract in December 2018.

Agents say as of now, there have been no obstacles in its construction.

Russian TV Lists US Nuclear Targets After Putin’s “Missile Crisis” Threat

Russian state television has listed U.S. military facilities that Moscow would target in the event of a nuclear strike, and said a hypersonic missile they are developing could hit the United States in five minutes.

During the broadcast Dmitry Kiselyov, presenter of TV news show “Vesti Nedeli,” showed a map of the United States and identified targets, including the Pentagon, Fort Ritchie military training center that closed in 1998, McClellan Air Force base closed back in 2001, and Jim Creek naval communications base.

Russian President Vladimir Putin delivers a state-of-the-nation address in Moscow, Russia, on Feb. 20, 2019. Putin said Russia needs to focus on raising living standards. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

Kiselyov said: “For now, we’re not threatening anyone but, if such a deployment takes place, our response will be instant.”

Kiselyov is a main conduit of the state television’s anti-American tone, and once said Moscow could turn the United States into radioactive ash.

When asked to comment, the Kremlin said it did not interfere in the state TV’s editorial policy.

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