UK Coalition Government to Cancel ID Cards

May 14, 2010 Updated: October 1, 2015

Identity Cards, to be scrapped by the new UK coalition government, were issued in November 2008 to non-European foreign nationals resident in the UK. They feature the holder's name, date of birth, photograph, fingerprint record and other biometric data. (Shaun Curry/AFP/Getty Images)
Identity Cards, to be scrapped by the new UK coalition government, were issued in November 2008 to non-European foreign nationals resident in the UK. They feature the holder's name, date of birth, photograph, fingerprint record and other biometric data. (Shaun Curry/AFP/Getty Images)
LONDON—The new coalition Conservative and Liberal Democrat government will scrap identity cards and the National Identity Register.

The Labour initiative was unpopular and the new two-party Cabinet will have no difficulty in halting the progress of the ID cards, which began to be issued in 2008.

Until legislation is passed, cards will remain live and people issued with the cards can continue to use them as an identity document and for travel in Europe, according to a statement on the Home Office website.

Anyone who has applied, or is thinking of applying, for an ID card is advised to wait for further announcements.

In general, the two parties do not agree on wider issues of immigration. The Lib Dems have given up their proposals for earned citizenship for illegal immigrants.