Uber Partners With Hertz to Offer 50,000 Tesla Rentals to US Ride-Hail Drivers

By Reuters
Reuters
Reuters
October 27, 2021 Updated: October 27, 2021

Uber Technologies Inc. on Wednesday said it is launching a new partnership with rental car company Hertz to offer 50,000 Tesla Inc. vehicles as a rental option to its ride-hail drivers by 2023.

Uber drivers can rent a Tesla through Hertz starting on Nov. 1 in Los Angeles, San Francisco, San Diego, and Washington DC, with the program later this year expanding to cities nationwide, the ride-hail company said in a blog post.

The Tesla rentals, consisting mostly of the electric vehicle company’s Model 3 sedan, will be available exclusively to Uber drivers and start out at $334 a week, including insurance and maintenance. Uber said the rental cost would drop to $299 per week or lower as the program expands in the coming year.

Uber’s announcement comes just days after Hertz on Monday said it would order 100,000 Tesla vehicles by the end of 2022. News of the biggest-ever Tesla order led to a share price rally and saw the company’s market value surpass $1 trillion.

Epoch Times Photo
A photo illustration shows a London taxi passing as the Uber app logo is displayed on a mobile telephone, as it is held up for a posed photograph in central London on Sept. 22, 2017. (Toby Melville/Reuters)

Wednesday’s deal represents Uber’s most significant step so far in expanding the use of EVs on its platform. The company has vowed to operate only electric vehicles on its U.S., Canadian, and European platform by 2030, and worldwide by 2040.

But only few ride-hail drivers can afford the higher EV sticker prices and in 2019, only 0.15 percent of all Uber miles in the U.S. and Canada were driven in electric vehicles, company data showed.

Hertz, which is emerging from bankruptcy, hopes the EV focus will allow the once-dominant brand to stand out against competitors.

Carmakers also consider partnerships with ride-hail companies as a convenient way to expose more consumers to non-fuel-powered vehicles.

Tesla did not respond to a request for comment.

By Tina Bellon

Reuters