Treatment for Bipolar Disorder

By Katherine Smith
Katherine Smith
Katherine Smith
is a licensed marriage and family therapist as well as a gifted divorce mediator in NYC. She is a former high school English teacher and college counselor with a passion for enhancing the lives of others. Additionally, Katherine has extensive training in Emotionally Focused Therapy (EFT) for couples, family systems, and group therapy. Readers can contact her at AskKathyMFT@gmail.com.
November 23, 2013 Updated: April 24, 2016

Bipolar disorder is noted for unusual mood changes. Sometimes people feel very happy and are unusually active (mania) and sometimes they are very sad and inactive (depression). These symptoms are more pronounced than the regular ups and downs everyone goes through.

Without treatment, bipolar symptoms can damage relationships and interfere with succeeding in school or at work. However, with continuous treatment people can lead productive, positive lives. Treatment includes:

  • a comprehensive assessment by a psychiatrist
  • appropriate medication, which is regularly evaluated and periodically adjusted by a psychiatrist
  • psychotherapy
  • a good support system consisting of family, friends, and others living with bipolar disorder
  • personal commitment to continue medication and treatment on a consistent basis
  • maintaining a healthy routine regarding eating and sleeping habits
  • patience regarding occasional set-backs 

For additional information, contact the National Institute of Mental Health at www.nimh.nih.gov

 

is a licensed marriage and family therapist as well as a gifted divorce mediator in NYC. She is a former high school English teacher and college counselor with a passion for enhancing the lives of others. Additionally, Katherine has extensive training in Emotionally Focused Therapy (EFT) for couples, family systems, and group therapy. Readers can contact her at AskKathyMFT@gmail.com.