Spain Adopts Strict Smoking Ban

January 2, 2011 Updated: October 1, 2015

A woman smokes a cigarette outside a cafe in Burgos, Spain on January 2, following the introduction of a new law today banning smoking in all bars, restaurants and public places.   (Cesar Manso/Getty Images )
A woman smokes a cigarette outside a cafe in Burgos, Spain on January 2, following the introduction of a new law today banning smoking in all bars, restaurants and public places. (Cesar Manso/Getty Images )
Spain implemented one of the harshest smoking laws in Europe Jan. 2. The new ban prohibits smoking in all enclosed public spaces, and several outdoor areas including parks and schools.

The enclosed public spaces affected by the law are defined as “‘any place accessible to the public or collective use, regardless of public or private,’ public or collective transport and terraces with ‘a maximum of two walls,’” according to a translated report from FACUA-Consumers in Action, a non-profit organization for consumer rights.

Among the exceptions to the ban are hotel rooms—if the hotel owner allows smoking. Prisoners, psychiatric patients, and small group of others will be permitted to smoke in enclosed areas, according to FACUA.

Fines for violating the law range from a modest 30 euros (about $40) to a whopping 600,000 euros (nearly $800,000) according to UK-based newspaper, The Telegraph.

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