Some People Are Claiming New Timberland ‘Mono Grey’ Boots Have a ‘Noose’

But many have said it's a needless controversy
February 25, 2016 3:26 pm Last Updated: February 26, 2016 8:34 am

After The Timberland Company revealed its “Mono Grey” 6-inch boot, there has been some controversy.

On Facebook and Twitter, some users said the extra laces on the boot (the coiled yellow-brown part) resembles a noose.

According to Footwear News, Timberland has long included the extra laces on their boots.

“So I’m the only one who sees that slave hanging noose!?!?!?” wrote one person on Facebook after the term appeared on Facebook Trends.

“Is that a noose on the boot, [a] subliminal message?” asked a Twitter user.

(Facebook screenshot - name has been blacked out)
(Twitter screenshot – names have been blacked out)

(Facebook screenshot - name has been blocked)
(Facebook screenshot – name has been blacked out)

 

(Facebook screenshot - name has been blacked out)
(Facebook screenshot – name has been blacked out)

 

But many others essentially said, “Give me a break” about the claims, saying that people are trying to drum up controversy when there is none. Others called the controversy “ridiculous.”

“Apparently people are offended by these boots because the laces represent a noose and somehow that is a jab at black people. Do people go out of their way just to find something offensive about everything? If you find these boots offensive, you should probably wear a helmet in public and while browsing the internet. If you think I am kidding just do a little looking around in the comments,” wrote one person.

Do people go out of their way just to find something offensive about everything?

A number of people liked the style of the boots and the new color.

“I want these so bad! Timberland boots are the most comfortable things in the world. And these ones are pretty!” wrote one Facebook user.

Meanwhile, some people made reference to a false rumor about the CEO of Timberland.

About a year ago, a hoax news article published on satirical website Naha Daily (which doesn’t exist anymore) said the CEO would “rather not see Blacks and Latinos in his boots.” Naha Daily, before it was taken down, billed itself as “completely fictional,” said hoax- and rumor-debunking website Snopes.com. 

Needless to say, all the social media attention is probably going to drive up sales for the “Mono Greys.” As the adage goes, “Any publicity is good publicity.”

 

Editor’s note: The first in-text picture incorrectly said it was “Facebook screenshot,” when it was really a screenshot sourced from Twitter.