Silent Hills TGS Trailer Evokes ‘Playable Teaser’ Terror

By Larry Ong
Larry Ong
Larry Ong
Journalist
Larry Ong is a New York-based journalist with Epoch Times. He writes about China and Hong Kong. He is also a graduate of the National University of Singapore, where he read history.
September 20, 2014 Updated: July 18, 2015

Remember the horror of P.T.?

At the Tokyo Game Show, game director Hideo Kojima showed off the new game concept trailer for Silent Hills, the upcoming game by Konami.

Last month, Kojima released a free “Playable Teaser” entitled “P.T.” for the PlayStation 4.

The game is played from the first person perspective, and the only thing players could do was zoom in and zoom out. Players would be stuck walking in the same corridors in a haunted house, with seemingly no way out. 

P.T. who go on to scare the daylights out of many a player with its game mechanics and terrifying ambiance created by the level design.

It also drove many players up the wall because they couldn’t crack the game, or if they successfully beat the game, they would still be unsure why and how they did it, and replicate the steps to success in a repeatable manner.

The Silent Hills “concept movie” that Kojima showed would incorporate many of the same aspects, such as tight, claustrophobic spaces, a murky, eerie atmosphere, and large monsters out to get the player.

Guillermo del Toro, who is co-producing the game with Kojima, also made an appearance at TGS in a pre-recorded video, and he explained how he got to work with Kojima.

“We talked about concepts and tools at his headquarters in Tokyo,” del Toro said.

“Then he sent his first version of the playable teaser.

“I saw it loved it.

“We then… exchanged ideas and the result was the playable teaser you see now.

“The concepts we’re discussing, the ideas that we’re discussing and the tools that are in play to create Silent Hills are going to render an incredibly intense and an incredibly scary game.”

Larry Ong
Journalist
Larry Ong is a New York-based journalist with Epoch Times. He writes about China and Hong Kong. He is also a graduate of the National University of Singapore, where he read history.