Should We Clone John Lennon?

By Tara MacIsaac
Tara MacIsaac
Tara MacIsaac
Tara MacIsaac is an editor and reporter who has worked on a variety of topics over the course of her ten years with The Epoch Times, including science, the environment, and local New York news. She is currently working with The Epoch Times edition based in Southern California.
August 21, 2013 Updated: July 18, 2015

John Lennon’s decayed tooth has been a prized object since he first gave it to housekeeper Dot Jarlett in the 1960s. Its current owner, Canadian dentist Michael Zuk, bought it at auction in 2011 for more than $30,000. 

Zuk now cherishes hopes of cloning the musician one day. 

In a  hypothetical debate on the value of cloning dead celebrities on chat forum TVTropes.com, a comment from “Five Seconds in the Future” reads: “Personality is shaped by far more than genetics. … It would open many ways of abuse, fraud etc. Imagine a Stalker starts to clone and raise a copy of his infatuation.”  

Article Continues after the discussion. Vote and comment

[tok id=1015b9b1711782a63bb8743a9b821f4b partner=1966]

 

 

Tara MacIsaac
Tara MacIsaac
Tara MacIsaac is an editor and reporter who has worked on a variety of topics over the course of her ten years with The Epoch Times, including science, the environment, and local New York news. She is currently working with The Epoch Times edition based in Southern California.