Northern Manhattan Subway Stations’ Renovations Commencing

By Andrea Hayley, Epoch Times
September 3, 2010 Updated: October 1, 2015

Assemblyman Adriano Espaillat talks about planned subway station renovations at the Dyckman Street station in Inwood, Manhattan on Thursday. (Angel Audiffred )
Assemblyman Adriano Espaillat talks about planned subway station renovations at the Dyckman Street station in Inwood, Manhattan on Thursday. (Angel Audiffred )
NEW YORK—Most tourist maps do not show it because it is so far north in Manhattan, and most New Yorkers probably haven’t been there, but for the over 7,000 daily riders who frequent the Dyckman Street 1 train subway station at 200th Street, it is apparent that something had to be done.

Inwood residents have long complained about a lack of wheelchair accessibility, leaking ceilings, a musky smell, and crumbling staircases characteristic of the northernmost stations serviced by the 1 train.

“The community implored the MTA for years to reconstruct the Dyckman Street station and I am pleased the authority answered our call,” said Assemblyman Adriano Espaillat.

Next week, repairs on six subway stations will commence. The 100-year-old Dyckman Street station will receive the bulk of the $93 million in capital funding reserved for the project.

The platforms and canopies of the raised platform that makes up the Dyckman Street station will be demolished and reconstructed, and tracks along the full length of the station will be replaced.

The stairs, walls, ceiling, railings, and damaged tiles will also be repaired at the historic station, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The station was built in 1906.

“The Dyckman train station is in deplorable condition and I am extremely glad that the MTA will be fixing it before it collapses like the 181st Street station did last summer,” said Councilman Ydanis Rodriguez.

Late last August part of the brick ceiling at the 181st Street station collapsed, falling 35 feet onto the tracks below, fanning fears that the northern Manhattan stations were all dangerous. Nobody was injured in the collapse, but service of the 1 train was halted for days while emergency contractors worked around the clock to make repairs.

Ninety-three million in capital funding secured through the state’s MTA bailout will be used for the renovations. In addition to work at the Dyckman Street station ($60 million), 207th, 215th, 238th and 242nd street stops will get rebuilt platform edges and canopies, and 207th and 225th street stations will get new stairs.

Starting in September and lasting 10 months, the northbound platform at Dyckman Street will be shut down. When repairs on that side are completed, the south side will be out of service.

It is expected that many people will avoid the line altogether and walk the few blocks over to the A train to get downtown. Free shuttle buses and the M3 bus will also be available.

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