MTA Ridership Population Shifts

April 15, 2012 Updated: October 1, 2015
Epoch Times Photo
A man checks his cell phone on a subway platform in the Union Square station of the L line on September 27, 2011 in New York. (STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)

NEW YORK—In Queens, A-line trains to the Racino saw great increases in ridership in 2011. With the reopening of the Roosevelt Island tram at the end of 2010, commuters packed into the revamped trams again and F train ridership across the East River decreased significantly in 2011.

All across the city, as populations shift, New Yorkers see more or less crowding during their daily commute. The Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) released its ridership statistics showing the difference between ridership in 2010 and 2011 late last week.

Manhattan

Most significant increases in ridership:
Cortlandt Street, R train, up 45.1 percent
Dyckman Street, A train, up 20.5 percent

Most significant decreases in ridership:
Dyckman Street, 1 train, down 45.8 percent
Roosevelt Island, F train, down 18 percent

Brooklyn

Most significant increases in ridership:
Avenue U, Q train, up 61.2 percent
Neck Road, Q train, up 56.9 percent

Most significant decreases in ridership:
Smith-9 streets, F and G trains, down 61.5 percent
15 Street-Prospect Park, F and G trains, down 24.6 percent

Bronx

Most significant increases in ridership:
Whitlock Avenue, 6 train, up 344.6 percent
Morrison Avenue-Soundview, 6 train, up 314.5 percent

Most significant decreases in ridership:
Elder Avenue, 6 train, down 74.8 percent
St. Lawrence Avenue, 6 train, down 72 percent

Queens

Most significant increases in ridership:
Aqueduct-North Conduit Avenue, A train, 99.4 percent
Aqueduct Racetrack, A train, 82.8 percent

Most significant decreases in ridership:
Beach 36 Street, A train, down 41 percent
Beach 60 Street, A train, down 29.6 percent