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Kash’s Corner: DOJ Exposed for Subpoenaing My Records in 2017, AG Rosenstein Lies; FBI’s $3.4 Million Payment to Twitter Just Tip of the Iceberg

It was recently revealed that in Nov. 2017, the Department of Justice (DOJ) and the FBI issued a grand jury subpoena to Google for Kash Patel’s personal records, emails, and credit card information. “And I wasn’t the only one. We’ve confirmed at least one other senior congressional staffer was subpoenaed,” says Kash Patel.

At the time, Patel was senior counsel and chief investigator for the House Intelligence Committee’s Russiagate investigation under then-Chairman Devin Nunes.

“If you send out a subpoena to investigate a member of Congress and/or his staff, the Attorney General must sign off on that. That means Rod Rosenstein himself…had to have personally signed off on it,” says Patel. Attorney General Jeff Sessions had recused himself and vested authority in Rosenstein.

Two months later, in a closed-door meeting in January 2018, Rosenstein threatened to subpoena the records of Devin Nunes and his staff, Patel says. He would later deny issuing such a threat when asked by Rep. Jim Jordan under oath.

“How is it that Rod Rosenstein threatened to subpoena my emails and my records along with Congressman Nunes’ in January of 2018. Yet he had already knowingly authorized it two months prior?” says Patel.

In this episode, we discuss these growing scandals for the DOJ and FBI, and we also look at a recent “Twitter Files” drop that shows the FBI paid Twitter over $3.4 million between Oct. 2019 and Feb. 2021. This is just the tip of the iceberg, argues Patel.

“I bet you it’s ten times that amount… In January, the Republicans have to demand every relationship agreement between the FBI and every big tech company and every single dollar of our money that was spent by the FBI to put on the largest disinformation campaign to rig a presidential election,” says Patel.

“And if anyone thinks that it was a one-off, they are completely wrong.”

FULL TRANSCRIPT

Kash Patel:

Hey everybody, welcome back to Kash’s Corner. This week, Jan, we’ve said it before, but all roads lead back to Russiagate and apparently they lead directly back to me.

Jan Jekielek:

There’s an amazing email that you got from Google not too long ago, I can hardly believe it, basically saying that your records were subpoenaed back in 2017 by the Department of Justice. Absolutely astounding. We’re going to get to that. Before we go there, I want to talk about the Twitter Files. There is so much being revealed in the digital space. We know that in a little over the course of a year, based on the records that Michael Shellenberger has revealed, $3.5 million went from the FBI to Twitter as part of their program of working together. What do you make of this?

Mr. Patel:

It’s a shocking level of government overreach and abuse—and this is $3.5 million that we know about. But if you rewind the clock to Kash’s Corner a couple of weeks ago, we were the first ones in the world to say, “Why isn’t Elon Musk revealing the contractual relationships that the FBI has, not just with Twitter, but also with Facebook and Google?” 

Here we are a couple of weeks later finding out that not only was there a contractual relationship, but taxpayer-funded dollars to the tune of 3.5 million that flowed from the FBI directly to Twitter to censor free speech. This is the criminalization of free speech at the highest order, because it was done at the behest of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. My point is not that, “Oh great, we found this landmine, $3.5 million.” I bet you it’s 10 times that amount.

This Congress coming in this January, the Republicans have to demand every relationship agreement between the FBI and every Big Tech company, and every single dollar of our money that was spent by the FBI to put on the largest disinformation campaign to rig a presidential election. This is just the beginning. If anyone thinks that it was a one-off, they are completely wrong. What is the FBI going to come around and say now? “Oh, we were just spending government dollars to help safeguard a nation?” That’s going to be the epithet they come back with, but we now know the true nature of their corrupt ways and we have to keep digging.

Mr. Jekielek:

There’s a couple of other things I want to touch on. I feel like what has come out through these multiple drops of Twitter Files is that these tools, originally developed for external influence, are now being used on the populace. What do you think?

Mr. Patel:

What you’re talking about is what we call PSYOPS or psychological operations, and that’s DOD military parlance. And what we do, generically speaking, is we have programs in place from the United States military standpoint to protect Americans and American interests when it comes to taking on our enemies; the CCP, Russia, Iran, terrorists, DPRK [Democratic People’s Republic of Korea,] and drug traffickers. We run these PSYOP programs. Of course, I’m not going to get into the how and where and when of how we do it. 

But the why we do it is so that we have an ability to collect intelligence in a very crafty, skillful, methodical way. We pour millions and millions of dollars into these programs. I’ll be the first one to tell you, they serve a purpose in the national security arena. 

I will be the first one to also tell you that these PSYOP programs and these tens of millions of government-funded taxpayer dollars were being used to push the PSYOP programs over to Twitter, so that they can go out and disperse it through their apparatus, i.e. the largest media company in the world, for what the United States government wanted them to pursue, based on political belief or politically-oriented targeting. This is the very thing that PSYOP programs were never intended for.

Now there needs to be another full investigation on the depth of the psychological operation programs that were put in play or borrowed from the DOD space, and the intelligence community space, and lent to the FBI who gave it to Twitter, apparently. There can be no justification on earth that that should have been permitted to happen in my opinion.

Mr. Jekielek:

The other thing is, I’ve seen this argument made in a few places and I just want to see what you make of it. It’s not like the FBI is going out and telling Twitter, “You have to do this. Here’s what you must do. We’re coercing you to do this.” The idea is that Twitter’s is just kind of enthusiastically participating in some cases. And then we actually see, even from Yoel Roth, some pushback against what they want to be doing. But largely they’re basically agreeing to do what the FBI wants. Now, does that actually constitute a First Amendment issue?

Mr. Patel:

Yes. I’ll push back on it in this way. I don’t believe for a second that in these weekly meetings they were having with Twitter and Facebook the FBI didn’t say, “This is what we, the FBI want. But we can’t as the FBI go out and publicly say, ‘We are forcing you, Twitter to do it.’” And what do you think Twitter is going to say then? Actually, they were in bed with the United States government to rig a presidential election and put out misinformation campaigns. Of course, they were a willing participant. 

It’s an ultimate meeting of the minds without two people signing a contract. Each side knew what the other wanted. You’re going to give me millions of dollars and access to PSYOP programs. You, the FBI are going to tell me who we should attack or shut down with these PSYOP programs, and then you the FBI are going to pay us, Twitter, to do it. 

That is a meeting of the minds in the most basic sense of a contractual agreement. It’s like saying that the hitman you hired to kill so-and-so didn’t sit down with the person who paid him, so there was no contract. Everybody knew what was going on. It’s complete BS to think otherwise, and it’s a farce to let the FBI hide behind such a pretext.

Mr. Jekielek:

When I see these Twitter Files come up and we’re learning about these PSYOPs and how they work, the Trump administration was really handicapped straight from the beginning from being able to do many, many things. Part of the reason for that was because of this constant never-ending barrage of attacks, many of them which turned out to be quite unsubstantiated. In this situation, could it be that this itself was a PSYOP that created this TDS (Trump Derangement Syndrome,)? Do you have any thoughts on this?

Mr. Patel:

100 per cent. The only thing I’ll say is that it took us off mission. What I mean by that is, the FBI set up an 80-agent election taskforce to go in and meet with the likes of Twitter on a weekly basis. That’s what we know so far. Do you know how much money it takes to run an 80-agent field office? That would be one of the largest FBI field offices in the country. You’re talking tens of millions of dollars. 

Just like we found Chris Wray lying to Congress about falsely padding statistics by taking and falsely labeling American citizens as violent domestic extremists, so that he can go to Congress and say, “Domestic terrorism is on the rise,” and by doing so, pulling field level FBI agents off hunting down child sex predators and bank robbers and murderers. This is the same thing. You have a coordinated effort by HQ at the Department of Justice and the FBI saying, “We are going to take hundreds of agents and analysts and lawyers off the national security and crime mission, and we’re going to put it on the censorship mission.” That is something no one’s talking about.

How many murders have been unsolved; how many bank robberies were unsolved; how many children were exploited; how many arms were trafficked; how many drugs, how much Chinese fentanyl poured in through our southern border, because we could have had these men and women on that mission and instead they were on a selective mission to effectively take down Donald Trump? That’s my biggest problem with this entire revelation.

Mr. Jekielek:

On this whole disinformation idea, the disinformation is real and it’s being pushed out by the Chinese Communist Party, and by Russia. This is real stuff that needs to be dealt with in some way, but it’s like this whole disinformation-combating system was completely co-opted.

Mr. Patel:

That’s it. You’re right. That’s the simplest way to put it. Congress has a massive lift come January to expose the documents, the money, the level of corruption and the players by name who were involved, and the multiple people that I believe lied to Congress under oath about the whole thing.

Mr. Jekielek:

If they had 80 agents post-2016 working on Twitter, how many did they actually have working on child sex abuse material and tracking down these sexual predators? I don’t think I really even want to know the answer to that.

Mr. Patel:

No, it’s terrifying. It’s one less agent who could have prevented one more child from being sexually exploited. If that’s not mission enough to refocus what this agency is supposed to be doing, then I don’t know what is.

Mr. Jekielek:

Kash, let’s shift gears to this absolutely fascinating email that you got from Google, at which point you said, “Hey guys, can you actually send me that subpoena that you’re talking about here, the grand jury subpoena? Tell me about what happened.

Mr. Patel:

Yes. We’ll go through the sequencing of this week and then we’ll rewind the clock. You say, it’s absolutely fascinating. I think I’ll go with that I was floored and stunned to receive an email from Google that notified me just this last week that five years ago in November 2017, the Department of Justice and the FBI issued a grand jury court subpoena for my personal records, my personal emails, and my finances. 

And I wasn’t the only one. We’ve confirmed at least one other senior congressional staffer was subpoenaed, and I believe up to 10 others. We only know about Google, because Google has a policy where after five years they finally let you know. So, they let me know and then I said, “What are you talking about? Send me the subpoena.” And now we have both the notification and the subpoena to show our audience that’s what happened. But now we need to rewind the clock and tell everybody why this is just absolutely government overreach and I believe unconstitutional.

Mr. Jekielek:

The stunning thing is that this was happening while you were the chief investigator for the intelligence committee. You were actually investigating the Department of Justice, and at this point it seems like the Department of Justice decided to investigate you.

Mr. Patel:

That’s exactly what happened, and let’s break it down. In August 2017, I was leading the Russiagate investigation for Chairman Nunes and the House Intelligence Committee. I was senior counsel and chief investigator for that committee, and we had started issuing our own congressional subpoenas to the FBI and DOJ. At the same time, we had also taken Fusion GPS to federal court, because our investigation had found out that the DNC Hillary Clinton campaign had paid for that thing called the Steele dossier. Remember that? 

While this is going on, on a parallel track, our investigation reveals that the FBI and DOJ lied to a federal court in a FISA warrant application to unlawfully surveil President Trump and his candidacy, and suppressed evidence of innocence while doing that, and used this fraudulent Steele dossier in it. So, we caught them. That’s the timeline we’re in right now, in the fall of 2017. 

What we learned was something we would put in the Nunes report later on. We’ve outlined that Russiagate corruption extensively on our show, so we don’t have to go back into that. But the timing is important because the subpoena, our audience will see, was delivered when? November 2017. It said, “We don’t want just the material from Kash Patel for this month, we want it to go back a year.” The subpoena requested all of my personal information from Google back to April 2016.

Do you know what I was doing in April 2016? I was a terrorism prosecutor at the National Security Division in the Department of Justice where this subpoena was issued from, and I would remain in that role for another year. The question I have as a former federal prosecutor, “What on earth are they investigating? What is the justification and the probable cause to come after me? What crimes did I or Devin Nunes or our other congressional staffers possibly commit? 

The answer is simple—we committed no crimes. We didn’t leak a single classified document. We were running a righteous constitutional oversight investigation that was exposing their corruption at the FBI and DOJ, and they didn’t want that out. It gets worse, Jan. 

At this time at the DOJ, Rod Rosenstein was the attorney general, and people say he was the deputy attorney general. If you recall, Jeff Sessions, the AG, recused himself from all Russiagate matters. So, Rod Rosenstein was the attorney general, the number one law enforcement officer in the land for these matters. And Chris Wray was the director of the FBI. That’s who we were up against in 2017.

Mr. Jekielek:

I want to remind people that at this time, Devin Nunes was the head of the intelligence committee. He had oversight over the intelligence community at this time when the DOJ starts investigating.

Mr. Patel:

You’re right. He had oversight over the AG and the FBI director. He was a member of the Gang of Eight, whose responsibility under the law is to receive the most sensitive intelligence to make sure our intelligence community, acts appropriately. And what did we learn? They acted entirely inappropriately and unlawfully by issuing at least the one subpoena. 

Let’s go to that now. We know there’s one subpoena against me and multiple other people, confirmed in writing. What other things did they subpoena regarding me and other staffers? Did they subpoena the records of a sitting congressman with the notifications that have to go out? As a former federal prosecutor, I know this. If you send out a subpoena to investigate a member of Congress and/or his staff, the attorney general must sign off on that. That means Rod Rosenstein himself, in November 2017 when this subpoena went out to me, had to have personally signed off on it.

Mr. Jekielek:

The meeting that you alluded to, that we absolutely have to talk about was reported back in 2018 by Catherine Herridge. Attorney General Rod Rosenstein attacked Congressman Devin Nunes, chair of the intel committee and made threats. Precisely what was done?

Mr. Patel:

And attacks me. So yes, in January 2018 we have a meeting in house intelligence office spaces. It’s myself, Chairman Nunes, another staffer, Rod Rosenstein, director of the FBI Chris Wray and a couple of their staffers in a secure space. What’s the substance of the conversation? We’re talking about the subpoenas we had sent the FBI, DOJ, starting in August of the prior year in 2017, and their failure to comply. “Why haven’t you produced the documentation requested over and over and over again?” 

We would learn the reason they didn’t is because they didn’t want us to see the Bruce Ohr 302s. They didn’t want us to see that the FBI intentionally withheld exculpatory evidence from a FISA court. They didn’t want us to see the Woods file documentation that shows the FBI knew more information that it gave to the federal court, because they wanted to target a political operative rather than pursue a crime. We had figured that out. 

The purpose of that meeting was to give them a chance to hear,  “Hey, why aren’t you giving us these documents? Congress has a constitutional oversight role and you, Rod Rosenstein and Chris Wray, weren’t even in charge when the Russiagate investigation started. Why are you covering up the crime?” The coverup is worse than the crime, as I always say, and they didn’t have a good answer for it.

Instead, what they did in this meeting in January 2018 is, Rod Rosenstein, the attorney general for these matters, looked at Devin Nunes after we had requested these lawfully sought documents, he literally said, “You guys like litigating? Well, we’re litigators too.” We, being the DOJ and FBI. “And if you continue to litigate, we’re going to subpoena your records and your emails.” 

Just picture this. The attorney general of the United States is sitting in a room with the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee and his senior staff, and he’s threatening to investigate them, because he doesn’t like the fact that congressional constitutional oversight is working to expose FBI corruption and DOJ corruption that hadn’t been seen, in my opinion, in our entire history. And just think about the chilling effect that has on congressional oversight.

Mr. Jekielek:

I want to highlight this too, that you guys hit these walls or threats in various ways, many times. This is pretty well documented. It was a rare group of people that would get more into it, instead of backing down. That’s something I’m very grateful for.

Mr. Patel:

I got to jump in here. Remember, the DOJ subpoena was issued by the FBI and DOJ in November 2017? This meeting happened two months later, January 2018. And what did I tell you? Those subpoenas had to be authorized in person by Rod Rosenstein himself, the very attorney general that would sign the last FISA warrant that went to the FISA court to surveil Donald Trump. The very FISA warrant that was rescinded and nullified by the DOJ as a result of our investigation years later. 

How is it that Rod Rosenstein threatened to subpoena my emails and my records, along with those of Congressman Nunes in January of 2018, yet he had already knowingly authorized it two months prior? We think he let it slip. Rod Rosenstein is known for having a temper and he let it slip. We had no idea, even while we were in the bowels of this investigation, that this attorney general would already have authorized the subpoena of Chairman Nunes’s congressional leadership staff because we were investigating him. 

Another appalling part of all of this is, and we memorialized this right after the meeting. We put it down in writing, me and the senior staffers that were there with Devin, because we wanted a record of it. We sent that written submission to House leadership, Speaker Ryan at the time, and his office. Because we thought they would have our back.

We thought the speaker of the House would have our back when the attorney general unlawfully and improperly accused us of impropriety and threatened us with subpoenas and investigation, because we were exposing their corruption. I learned a lesson that day in the response from Paul Ryan’s office. They said, “This is not a matter that they’re going to take up. You are free to speak to the DOJ inspector general. And those emails have been provided to the media before.” They’re not my words, those are their words. 

That was more disheartening, if I’m being honest Jan, than the threats of a subpoena from Rosenstein, which we now know had already issued the subpoena. The other matter was, the DOJ commented on this reporting by Catherine Herridge. Essentially they were like, “Oh no, that’s not what happened. It didn’t happen.” Then they went on to, well, it did happen. Rod Rosenstein was just protecting himself, because he felt he was going to be held in contempt of Congress, so he wanted to get the records. 

Is the the Department of Justice’s position that when you, Congress, rightfully catch the FBI and DOJ abusing their authority and you may hold that individual in contempt, that the attorney general of the United States of America, the number one law enforcement officer, has the authority to hijack the police state and use it for his personal investigation?

None of that makes sense. That just goes to show you how off base the Department of Justice was in trying to protect Rod Rosenstein. And if that weren’t enough, the Department of Justice in the same series of articles said, “Rod Rosenstein is going to refer me and my colleagues for investigation. He’s going to ask Paul Ryan to do so through the House counsel’s office at the time. This is the attorney general. 

A, he had already issued subpoenas against us unlawfully. B, he had threatened us. C, they had lied about it to the media. And then, the DOJ went one step further and said, “We also want the House to go after you. “For what, I asked. For what? For exposing the criminality of Russiagate? For exposing the corruption of the FISA court and the lies that the likes of McCabe, Comey, Strzok, Page, and so many others executed?” If they had given me any simple basis other than it was a political vendetta, I would have listened. And they still haven’t to this day, because there is none. We didn’t leak classified information. We didn’t break the law.

We didn’t do anything other than our jobs, which was to serve the American people and provide constitutional oversight. I just say this, Jan, to put the shoe on the other foot for everybody out there saying, “What if Adam Schiff’s chief counsel and senior investigator had been subpoenaed by the Trump Department of Justice, would that not be literally the only story everybody’s talking about right now next to the Twitter Files? Absolutely. 

I would also be demanding the answers to the questions I’ve been posing today, the same ones. It wouldn’t be any different. It’s just like, what if Hunter Biden’s laptop were Don Junior’s? It’s the same thing, and I always bring that up to help put it in context.

Mr. Jekielek:

I can’t help but think, Kash, that this actually was Trump’s Department of Justice.

Mr. Patel:

Exactly, and that’s what’s even more shocking. But you have to remember the players involved. Rod Rosenstein was the AG for these matters, and he signed the last fraudulent FISA warrant that was rescinded during his tenureship based on our investigation. Chris Wray was his FBI director who would later help cover up all of the fraudulent actions. So, these are the people that were threatening me, and actually now we know were investigating me. 

Whether they work for Trump or another administration is almost irrelevant. We knew the impetus behind their everyday job—get me, get Devin, get Trump, just for a political basis. I just want to add one point. This is the same Rod Rosenstein that went to then deputy Director Andy McCabe at the FBI and said, “We should use the 25th Amendment to remove Donald Trump from the presidency of the United States.” That has been widely reported in the media. 

So much so that McCabe himself wrote it down in a memorandum that’s now been released by the FBI, stating the details of that meeting that included the deputy attorney general at the time, Rod Rosenstein, who volunteered to wear a wire against the president of the United States, Donald Trump. These are the people we’re dealing with.

Mr. Jekielek:

I remember when that story came out, I found it really hard to believe. There’s so much that we didn’t know back then. As we’re talking here about the Twitter Files releases and everything that we’re just talking about right now, I’m reminded of this quote from Jim Jordan. He says, “I have concerns about whether the government was running a misinformation operation on we the people. It’s something that transcends party almost, doesn’t it?

Mr. Patel:

You’re absolutely right, which is why when Jim Jordan takes the gavel as a chairman of the judiciary committee, he’s got a lot of work to do. He should be calling for an investigation into this very matter immediately, with a preservation of all records subpoenaing all emails and documentation. Then they should be asking, “What other subpoenas went out against what other congressional staffers and what other members of Congress? What was your justification for it, and who authorized it? Who did you tell about these investigations, and what was your basis for any single one of these subpoenas?” 

The answers, I’m going to predict, are going to shock America, because they’re going to be totally unjustified. Here’s the pretext they’ll come up with though, Jan. They’ll say, “Oh, national security, we heard about leaks from Congress.” They’ll blanket that investigation with that statement or that umbrella cover. And then, we have to go deeper, “What are you talking about? What basis did you have to say that we, Chairman Nunes and his staff, were leaking classified information?” 

None, because we weren’t. We now know who Adam Schiff and Eric Swalwell were. That’s been proven. So, what are they going to say? People who were not working for the guy you should have been investigating were subpoenaed because they were exposing your corruption? We now know that to be true. And if that’s not enough, we now have definitive proof of the Attorney General Rod Rosenstein lying to Congress under oath when Jim Jordan questioned him about these matters that we just discussed.

Jim Jordan:

Mr. Rosenstein, did you threaten staffers on the House Intelligence Committee? Media reports indicate you did.

Rod Rosenstein:

Media reports are mistaken.

Jim Jordan:

Sometimes. But this is what they said, having the nation’s number one law enforcement officer threaten to subpoena your calls and emails is downright chilling. Did you threaten to subpoena their calls and emails?

Rod Rosenstein:

No sir, and there’s no way to subpoena phone calls.

Jim Jordan:

Well, I mean, I’m just saying, I’m reading what the press said. I’m reading what the press said.

Rod Rosenstein:

Well, I would suggest that you not rely on what the press says, sir.

Jim Jordan:

Well, I didn’t ask if there’s no way to do it. I asked if you said it.

Rod Rosenstein:

If I said what?

Jim Jordan:

What I just read you.

Rod Rosenstein:

No, I did not.

Mr. Patel:

It’s on national TV. He was the Attorney General Rod Rosenstein under oath and he lied. Here’s the other kicker. He, Rod Rosenstein at that time of that congressional testimony later in 2018, didn’t volunteer to the chairman of the judiciary committee, Jim Jordan, that he, Rod Rosenstein, had already authorized the multiple subpoenas of the very congressional staffers he was asked about threatening. 

The question now needs to be asked, at the time when Rod Rosenstein is now subpoenaed, which I’m calling for in this next Congress, “Why did you lie? Why did you cover it up? Why didn’t you tell the judiciary committee that you had already issued those subpoenas? Why did you threaten congressional staffers? And what was the DOJ and FBI’s actual basis for doing so, other than creating a political vendetta, because they exposed your fraud and your corruption in the FISA warrant you Rod Rosenstein signed unlawfully, lying to a federal court?”

Mr. Jekielek:

Kash, as we finish up, it seems like on every episode we have very, very important things for Congress to investigate. What will make these investigations actually have meaning?

Mr. Patel:

The production of documents and testimony for the American public and the world to see. That’s the whole point of congressional oversight. Congress can’t charge people. They find that someone violated their duty under subpoena, they can hold them in contempt, but they’re not the DOJ. More importantly though, all of these documents, whether it’s the Twitter Files, whether it’s the contracts with the FBI showing the millions of dollars and the censorship direction that they engaged in, in a partnership with Twitter and Facebook, or whether it’s all this stuff with Rod Rosenstein and subpoenaing congressional staffers and investigating the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee. 

All of these matters, as you know from me, Jan, are written down by the government gangsters themselves, because they’re so arrogant that they think they’ll never get caught. So, you don’t need to believe us. You just need Congress to go get the FBI’s own reports. I bet they recorded the conversations we were talking about. Go and get their own reports on the subpoena justifications, those exist for sure. Somebody typed that up at DOJ and said, “We’re going to a grand jury and getting a subpoena.” Then get the memorandums that show the attorney general authorized it personally, and why did he do it and who did he tell?

A successful oversight investigation will not just answer these questions, but it will show the American people the answers to these questions by divulging the government’s own paperwork from the FBI, the DOJ, and the IC. That is what we did in Russiagate. That is what we did by releasing our report and things like the Nunes memo and the FBI reports and the Bruce Ohr 302s and the Steele source-reporting documents. We did it in a smart way where no one died, no sources were crushed, and no relationships were ruined. I know the fake news media is going to start screaming about that again when we get to this next iteration. But our audience should know there’s a smart way to do it. More than anyone else they are owed that service by congressional oversight.

Mr. Jekielek:

So much to be done. Kash. It’s time now for our shout-out.

Mr. Patel:

It is indeed, Jan. As we approach the Christmas holiday, I want to give a shout-out to everyone who has been a fan of Kash’s Corner and supported you and me, and our entire team, to make this show a reality. We’re six seasons in and I hope during this holiday season you get some downtime with your family and your friends. 

And that you get a little bit of time off, Jan, that goes for you too. I hope you get a day off and we can truly enjoy the commentary on the live chat. We’ll be back with you on Friday night on the live chat for every episode. I wish you guys and your families a very Merry Christmas and we’ll see you in the new year.

Mr. Jekielek:

For me over here at Epoch Times HQ, where I’m recording from right now, a most Merry Christmas to absolutely everyone out there that watches this show, that watches Epoch TV, and that reads the Epoch Times. We’ll see you next week on Kash’s Corner.

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