‘Iron Man’ Stunt Goes Wrong: Theatergoers Scared

By Tara MacIsaac
Tara MacIsaac
Tara MacIsaac
Tara MacIsaac is an editor and reporter who has worked on a variety of topics over the course of her ten years with The Epoch Times, including science, the environment, and local New York news. She is currently working with The Epoch Times edition based in Southern California.
May 14, 2013 Updated: May 14, 2013

Iron Man stunt goes wrong: Actors dressed up with fake guns entered a Montana theater as part of a stunt promotion for Iron Man 3, but some theatergoers were scared instead of entertained.

A cosplay group—cosplay is short for costume play, a type of subculture in which people dress up and act like fictional characters—entered Goodrich Capital 8 Theaters during the opening weekend of Iron Man 3 at the beginning of May. The group was dressed as S.H.I.E.L.D operatives, members of a fictional intelligence agency featured in Marvel Comics stories.

They were carrying guns, and recalled for some the Aurora, Col., attack last year during which a gunman dressed in body armor opened fire at a showing of The Dark Knight Rises.

John Morlock is a retired army war veteran who suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder. He told ABC 17 News it disturbed him to see one of the actors entering the theater.

Capt. Doug Shoemaker of Jefferson City police told ABC 17: “Everything is in place: it’s the opening night of a superhero movie, somebody walking in in all dark clothes, … carrying a rifle. Everything points to bad things that are about to happen.”

The theater issued an apology on its Facebook page on May 10: “We apologize and are sympathetic to those who felt they were in harm’s way with our character promotion for Iron Man 3. This was not a publicity stunt. We have worked with the Cosplacon group on many movies to dress up and help entertain our customers. … Going forward we will take the necessary steps to make sure this doesn’t happen again. Security and safety for our customers is our number one priority.”

Tara MacIsaac is an editor and reporter who has worked on a variety of topics over the course of her ten years with The Epoch Times, including science, the environment, and local New York news. She is currently working with The Epoch Times edition based in Southern California.