Insider: China’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs Offers Sexual Services to Bribe Foreign Officials

April 26, 2019 Updated: April 27, 2019

It is an open secret that many Chinese have heard about before. China’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs offers sexual services to foreign diplomats as a form of bribery, so that they will do China’s bidding.

A specific example was recounted by a Chinese businessman who now lives in exile in the United States. He has since described many instances of corruption and abuse that he personally witnessed while working in China.

Hu Liren, 52, is an inventor and entrepreneur from Shanghai, China. His company, Shanghai Guren Environmental Protection Technology Co., owns several patents on energy-saving air conditioning systems that utilize geothermal energy.

In 2017, Hu discovered that the pipes supplied by a government-supported factory in Shandong Province to his company were faulty. Hu sought legal redress from several local government agencies and departments, to no avail. After about a year of fruitless efforts, Hu decided to move to the United States in September 2018 and seek justice at the Chinese embassy in Washington D.C.

Hu Liren and the licenses of intellectual patents he owns. (Provided to The Chinese-language Epoch Times by interviewee)

Sexual Bribery

Hu first posted on Twitter April 19 a bold accusation: “China’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs has a special working team in Beijing, which is dedicated to finding beauties and sending them to the visiting foreign politicians to perform sexual bribes.”

In an exclusive interview with the Chinese-language Epoch Times on April 23, he explained the story behind his tweet.

Hu said that one of his female friends was once recruited by the Ministry to provide sexual services to the president of an African country. But the president sexually violated her. She told Hu and four other friends about the incident.

“My friend is originally from northeastern China. She is in her 40s, beautiful and charming,” Hu said.

“I really want to give you her name and show you her photos, but I shouldn’t,” Hu said, noting that his friend is still in China and could receive retribution if her identity is exposed.

To protect her identity, Hu used a pseudonym to refer to her, Candy.

Hu said a lady in her 50s was the madam paid by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs to provide prostitutes. “She isn’t an employee of the Ministry, but has good relations with several officials [in the special team],” Hu explained.

Several years ago, when an African president visited China, the president’s staff relayed to the Ministry that he wanted sexual services, but did not want to hire a prostitute.

The madam reached Candy, as she was unemployed at the time and needed the money.

After the madam and the Ministry agreed on a 100,000 yuan ($14,880) sexual service deal, Candy flew to Guangzhou City in southern China’s Guangdong Province to accompany the African leader for two nights.

“After she [Candy] flew back from Guangzhou, we had a dinner together, in which she cried and cried after drinking heavily,” Hu said. When Hu and Candy’s friends tried to comfort her, Candy told the story of how the African leader forced her to perform sex acts that she did not consent to.

Candy said she felt insulted and humiliated.

“This is not an individual case,” Hu said. “The sexual services team at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs is in charge of this sexual bribery.”

This is not the first time foreign diplomats have been reported to get caught in a honey trap.

In a sex scandal in 2011, South Korean authorities revealed that more than 10 South Korean diplomats working in China had sexual relations with a Chinese woman called Deng Xinmin, who was able to extract key intelligence information from them.

Deng Xinmin, from Shanghai, was the honey trap. Her husband, a South Korean national whom media referred to as Mr. J, was the one who exposed her misdeeds.

Mr. J. contacted South Korean authorities after he discovered sensitive information on his wife’s USB stick, including the telephone numbers of 200 high-ranking South Korean government officials and congress members; the emergency contacts of the South Korean consulate in Shanghai; and the records of issued visas.

The Seoul government said at a March 2011 press conference that the involved diplomats included the former consul general in Shanghai, Kim Jung Ki.

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