Haiti’s Worst Aftershock Causes Further Devastation

By Peter Valk
Peter Valk
Peter Valk
Peter Valk is a tea expert who has extensively travelled in Asia, interrupted by odd jobs and a short spell of studying anthropology in the Netherlands. In his travels, he steeped himself in Asian culture, learned Chinese, met his wife and found his passion. He has been in tea business over seven years, selling Chinese tea and giving workshops on Chinese tea and culture. Currently, he is living in the Netherlands where he is busily but mostly happily making up for his travel time.
January 20, 2010 Updated: October 1, 2015

Haitian children wash and collect water from a broken water line in Port-au-Prince where the most powerful aftershock yet hit the capital on Wednesday morning. (Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
Haitian children wash and collect water from a broken water line in Port-au-Prince where the most powerful aftershock yet hit the capital on Wednesday morning. (Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
Haiti was struck by another heavy 5.9 aftershock on Wednesday, further putting the already devastated country in ruins.

The latest quake was centered about 35 miles west-southwest of the Haitian capital Port-au-Prince.

Moments after the latest quake people were reportedly fleeing to the streets and jumping from buildings in sheer panic. Other people in the capital had already been sleeping in the streets out of fear of being hit by collapsing buildings.

"It kind of felt like standing on a board on top of a ball," said Steven Payne, a U.S. Army Staff Sgt. describing the aftershock, reported AP.

The extent of the damage and the number of victims from the latest quake is still unknown. The death toll from the initial Jan. 12 earthquake has been estimated at 200,000 to 250,000, with about 1.5 million people left homeless.

Peter Valk
Peter Valk is a tea expert who has extensively travelled in Asia, interrupted by odd jobs and a short spell of studying anthropology in the Netherlands. In his travels, he steeped himself in Asian culture, learned Chinese, met his wife and found his passion. He has been in tea business over seven years, selling Chinese tea and giving workshops on Chinese tea and culture. Currently, he is living in the Netherlands where he is busily but mostly happily making up for his travel time.