Elon Musk Says This Is Why He Wouldn’t ‘Demonize Oil And Gas’ As He Lists 3 Key Pillars of a Sustainable Energy Future

By Benzinga
Benzinga
Benzinga
September 8, 2022 Updated: September 8, 2022

Tesla Inc. CEO Elon Musk has consistently come across as a crusader for a sustainable future for humanity, and his numerous ventures are geared toward achieving the goal.

What Happened

In an interview at the recent ONS conference held in Stavanger, Norway, Musk explained that his perspective on disruption is to consider what course of action is most likely to result in a better future for humanity.

Additionally, he also clarified that he is not someone who would demonize oil and gas because, in his opinion, they are now required for civilization to function.

“I think we actually need more oil and gas, and not less, but simultaneously [should] move as fast as we can to a sustainable energy economy,” he said.

Musk appreciated Norway for its efforts in tapping ocean winds, which he thinks have a “massive untapped” potential. Energy generation should be combined with stationary storage battery packs to buffer the energy, he opined. He also reiterated that he is pro-nuclear and called for keeping nuclear plants going.

The three pillars of a sustainable energy future, according to the Tesla CEO, are energy generation, storage, and electric vehicles.

Musk also noted that he has a plan for producing rocker repellent sustainably. This substance is made up of 80 percent liquid oxygen, which can be tapped from the atmosphere, and 20 percent methane, which can be sustainably produced from carbon-di-oxide and water.

If you were to look ahead, the disruption in the energy industry is electrification, the billionaire said. He expects EVs to account for 50 percent of new vehicles sold in 2030, with the proportion increasing to 80 percent or more by 2035.

The rate at which battery production increases, according to Musk, is what determines how quickly the world switches to sustainable energy. He added, the processing equipment needed to convert ore into battery-grade materials, more than the rarity of the metals used in batteries, is the main limitation in battery production.

He said all these would go into the “Master Plan Part 3,” which would delve into steps needed to scale sustainable energy, the limiting factors, and how these could be potentially accelerated. He stated that the plan he is now creating would be completed in a month or two.

By Shanthi Rexaline

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