Diet Soda Teeth Harm as Bad as Crack or Meth: Study

By Jack Phillips
Jack Phillips
Jack Phillips
Breaking News Reporter
Jack Phillips is a breaking news reporter at The Epoch Times based in New York.
May 29, 2013 Updated: July 18, 2015

Diet soda teeth harm? A case study has found that drinking diet soda can do as much harm to a person’s teeth as regular methamphetamine or crack cocaine usage. However, the American Beverage Association called the study “irresponsible.”

The study, published in General Dentistry, shows that frequent consumption diet soda erodes enamel, which protects teeth, reported CBS News. When enamel is damaged or destroyed, cavities usually form.

Researchers looked at a 29-year-old meth user, a 51-year-old former crack cocaine abuser, and and a woman in her 30s who drank two to three liters of diet soda per day for three years.

“Each person experienced severe tooth erosion caused by the high acid levels present in their ‘drug’ of choice–meth, crack, or soda,” study author Dr. Mohamed A. Bassiouny of Pennsylvania said.

The woman who drank soda “mentioned that when doing so, she habitually leaned on her left side against the arm of the sofa while watching television,” he told HealthDay, noting there was “massive” damage to the left side of her mouth.

“None of the teeth affected by erosion were salvageable,” he said, adding that the woman had to have her teeth replaced by dentures.

However, the American Beverage Association (ABA) said the soda drinker had bad dental hygiene.

“The woman referenced in this article did not receive dental health services for more than 20 years–two-thirds of her life. To single out diet soda consumption as the unique factor in her tooth decay and erosion — and to compare it to that from illicit drug use–is irresponsible,” the ABA told CBS.

Jack Phillips
Breaking News Reporter
Jack Phillips is a breaking news reporter at The Epoch Times based in New York.