Diablo 3 Reaper of Souls: Patch 2.1.1 Out in the US; Kadala Change Explained

By Larry Ong
Larry Ong
Larry Ong
Journalist
Larry Ong is a New York-based journalist with Epoch Times. He writes about China and Hong Kong. He is also a graduate of the National University of Singapore, where he read history.
September 28, 2014 Updated: July 18, 2015

Diablo 3 patch 2.1.1 is live. 

In a nutshell, Blizzard ended up buffing Witch Doctors, made pets more durable, and made some changes to Kalada, the Blood Shard merchant. 

Blizzard game designer Travis Day explained the change made to Kadala on the Diablo 3 forums

“The Kadala change is primarily meant to be a quality of life change for players. Having to fill up your inventory and run back and forth to the blacksmith could be a mildly cumbersome experience and we wanted to improve that. All items on Kadala had their cost increased, when this was done the chance for her to give you items was also increased but by more than the cost justified. For the same number of shards as before players will now walk away with 1/3 more legendary items.”

Day added: “Since we wanted this change to be purely better for players and we know that many people get their crafting materials from Kadala we also decided to add a lot of extra crafting reagent drops to Greater and normal Rift Guardians. The overall impact should be that you are getting roughly the same amount of crafting materials, except instead of getting primarily yellow mats like Kadala gives you, the mats on the Guardians could be white, blue, or yellow. This should help even out the quantities of assorted material types instead of flooding players with just one type like Kadala was inclined to do.”

Blizzard will continue to monitor the impact of the changes, and will make adjustments if they have any “meaningful negative impact on the ability for players to generate crafting material.” 

Check out the full patch notes here

 

Larry Ong
Journalist
Larry Ong is a New York-based journalist with Epoch Times. He writes about China and Hong Kong. He is also a graduate of the National University of Singapore, where he read history.