Can China Be a World Leader?

China in Context Newsletter Issue 37
By Larry Ong, Epoch Times
June 5, 2017 10:29 am Last Updated: June 11, 2017 1:18 pm

In recent months, mainstream media outlets have rushed to laud China as the new “world leader” after moves by U.S. President Donald Trump.

Trump emphasizes “America First”; China is hailed as the new “world leader” of globalization (granted, Chinese leader Xi Jinping did express such aspirations in his speech at the 2017 World Economic Forum).

Trump pulls the United States out from the Paris climate accord; China is being seriously considered by several publications as a possible replacement for the United States as a climate change world leader (though many admit that it might be a challenge for a country that’s the leading carbon dioxide polluter and still largely relies on burning coal to meet its energy needs).

China might indeed be a genuine contender to lead the world in future. But definitely not with the Chinese Communist Party at the helm.

Two issues are most striking—ethics, and the political nature of the Chinese regime.

Readers will have noticed our article series on exposing communism—an ideology that has brought death, destruction, and despair to millions worldwide.

The Party of Mao Zedong has never apologized for the tens of millions killed during the Great Leap Forward, a disastrous attempt at mass collectivization during the late 1950s to early 1960s.

Employees of the Shin Chiao Hotel in Beijing build in the hotel courtyard (background) a small and rudimentary smelting steel furnace during the period of the "Great Leap Forward " in October 1958. (JACQUET-FRANCILLON/AFP/Getty Images)
Employees of the Shin Chiao Hotel in Beijing build in the hotel courtyard (background) a small and rudimentary smelting steel furnace during the period of the “Great Leap Forward ” in October 1958. (JACQUET-FRANCILLON/AFP/Getty Images)

The Party officially graded Mao’s tenure as “three parts bad, seven parts good.” The Chairman oversaw the deaths of an estimated 44.5 million to 72 million Chinese, according to “The Black Book of Communism,” and wrecked China’s 5,000-year-old culture and traditions in the span of a single decade.

The Party is still trying to whitewash its killing of student demonstrators in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square, 28 years after the event. (Last week, eyebrows were raised when Facebook, which is seeking to break into the Chinese market, appeared to censor efforts to commemorate the June 4 anniversary of the massacre by users of the social media platform.)

Party media recently claimed that the People’s Liberation Army will exit its business ventures, including health care services, by June 2018. What the Party hasn’t mentioned, however, is that military hospitals are some of the worst perpetrators of forced organ harvesting in China. The prisoners of conscience that organ harvesting mainly targets, Falun Gong practitioners, are still being brutally abused nearly 18 years after former Party boss Jiang Zemin first ordered his campaign to persecute them.

Indeed, even if the Chinese regime was being led by a benign despot, any upside would be eventually negated in the long run so long as the Party exists. Many Party and state apparatuses have the prefix “People’s” in their titles, but these apparatuses ultimately exist to protect the Communist Party from the people, rather than to wholeheartedly serve them.

Should bandits, brigands, and “butchers of Beijing” be allowed to lead the world? Or should the world’s media instead avoid championing a murderous regime that still clings fast to a dead-end ideology?