2022 Primary: Orange County’s Certified June Election Results

By Micaela Ricaforte
Micaela Ricaforte
Micaela Ricaforte
July 1, 2022 Updated: July 5, 2022

Thirty-five percent of Orange County voters participated in the June primary election, according to the state registrar of voters, who certified Orange County’s recent election results.

Of those who voted, 88.6 percent did so by mail while 11.4 percent cast a ballot in person at one of the county’s 181 voting centers.

This election received 636,497 ballots—0.2 percent higher than the 2018 primary election’s 635,224 and 87 percent higher than the 340,187 in 2014.

The county certified the results on June 25—ahead of the July 7 deadline—after completing two audits.

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An official vote-by-mail ballot packet in Irvine, Calif., on May 16, 2022. (John Fredricks/The Epoch Times)

The first audit compares hand-counted results to the results of the county’s voting system, while the second audit, which utilized state-approved auditing software, achieved a 95 percent confidence rate in the elections’ outcome, according to the registrar.

An accuracy testing of the county’s voting system equipment was also conducted, according to Registrar Bob Page.

“This was the first Orange County election I have administered as registrar of voters, and I could not be more pleased with the level of focus, accuracy, and integrity that my team demonstrated,” Page said. “We worked diligently to serve the voters of Orange County, providing them with equal access to the election process, protecting the integrity of their votes, and maintaining a transparent, accurate, and fair elections process.”

Below are the certified results of Orange County’s elections.

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The Orange County Registrar of Voters in Santa Ana, Calif., on March 5, 2021. (John Fredricks/The Epoch Times)

US Representative

38th District

Democrat Linda T. Sanchez, with 49.5 percent of the vote, will face off in the November general election against Republican Eric J. Ching, who had 36.7 percent of the vote. The district includes a portion of Los Angeles and Orange Counties, including the whole cities of Norwalk, Diamond Bar, Walnut, Montebello, Whittier, La Habra, La Habra Heights, La Mirada, Santa Fe Springs, and Pico Rivera, and portions of Downey, Pomona, and Industry.

40th District

Democrat Asif Mahmood, who received 41 percent of the vote, will run in November against incumbent Republican Young Kim who received 33.7 percent of the vote. The district includes portions of Orange, Riverside, and San Bernardino counties, including the whole cities of Aliso Viejo, Lake Forest, Mission Viejo, Rancho Santa Margarita, Tustin, and Villa Park, and portions of the cities of Anaheim, Brea, Chino Hills, Corona, Laguna Hills, Laguna Woods, Orange, and Yorba Linda.

45th District

Republican Michelle Steel with 49 percent of the vote will go head-to-head with Democratic challenger Jay F. Chen, who had 40 percent of the vote. The district includes portions of Los Angeles and Orange counties, including the whole cities of Artesia, Buena Park, Cerritos, Cypress, Fountain Valley, Hawaiian Gardens, La Palma, Los Alamitos, Placentia, and Westminster, and portions of the cities of Brea, Fullerton, Garden Grove, Lakewood, and Yorba Linda.

46th District

Democrat Lou Correa, with 49.1 percent of the vote, will face Republican Christopher J. Gonzales with 15.5 percent of the vote in November. The district includes a portion of Orange County, including the whole cities of Santa Ana and Stanton, and portions of Anaheim, Fullerton, Garden Grove, and Orange.

47th District

Democrat Katie Porter took 51.7 percent of the vote in the primary and will now face off with Republican Scott Baugh, who received 30.8 percent of the vote. The district includes a portion of Orange County, including the whole cities of Costa Mesa, Huntington Beach, Irvine, Newport Beach, and Seal Beach, and portions of Laguna Beach, Laguna Hills, and Laguna Woods.

49th District

Mike Levin, a Democrat, received 42.6 percent of the vote during the June 7 primary and will face Bryan Maryott, who got 17.76 percent, in November. Maryott narrowly beat out fellow Republican Lisa Bartlett by 0.01 percent. The district includes portions of Orange and San Diego counties, including the whole cities of Carlsbad, Dana Point, Del Mar, Encinitas, Laguna Niguel, Oceanside, San Clemente, San Juan Capistrano, Solana Beach, and Vista, and a portion of Laguna Beach.

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The U.S. Capitol is shown in Washington on June 5, 2003. Both houses of the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Senate and the U.S. House of Representatives, meet in the Capitol. (Stefan Zaklin/Getty Images)

California Senate

30th District

Republican Mitch Clemmons with 51 percent of the vote will be challenged in November by Democrat Bob Archuleta, who received 28.9 percent. The district includes the whole cities of Bellflower, Diamond Bar, Downey, Industry, La Habra Heights, La Mirada, La Puente, Montebello, Norwalk, Pico Rivera, Santa Fe Springs, Walnut, and Whittier, and portions of the cities of Brea, Placentia, and West Covina.

32nd District

Republican Kelly Seyarto, with 69 percent of the primary vote, will go head-to-head with Brian Nash, a Democrat, who received 30.9 percent. The district includes the whole cities of Canyon Lake, Chino Hills, Lake Elsinore, Murrieta, Norco, Temecula, and Wildomar, portions of the cities of Brea, Corona, Menifee, Riverside, and Yorba Linda.

34th District

Democrat Tom Umberg received 58.4 percent of the vote and will run in November against Republican Rhonda Shader, who received 41.5 percent of the vote. The district includes the whole city of La Habra, and portions of the cities of Anaheim, Buena Park, Fullerton, Garden Grove, Orange, Placentia, and Santa Ana.

36th District

Republican Janet Nguyen won 57.3 percent of the vote and will meet Kim Carr, a Democrat, and a current Huntington Beach City councilwoman, in the general election. Carr received 42.7 percent of the vote. The district includes the whole cities of Artesia, Cerritos, Cypress, Dana Point, Fountain Valley, Hawaiian Gardens, Huntington Beach, Laguna Beach, La Palma, Los Alamitos, Newport Beach, San Clemente, Seal Beach, Stanton, and Westminster, and portions of the cities of Buena Park and Garden Grove.

38th District

Republican Matt Gunderson, who received 54.7 percent of the vote, will go head-to-head against Catherine Blakespear, a Democrat, who received 31.9 percent of the vote. A second Democrat—Joe Kerr—ran in the primary and received 13.3 percent of the vote. The district includes the whole cities of Carlsbad, Del Mar, Encinitas, Laguna Hills, Mission Viejo, Oceanside, Rancho Santa Margarita, San Juan Capistrano, Solana Beach, and Vista, and portions of the city of San Diego.

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The California flag in Newport Beach, Calif., on Aug. 25, 2021. (John Fredricks/The Epoch Times)

California Assembly

59th District

Republican Phillip Chen has won 99.1 percent of the vote, followed by write-in candidate Leon Q. Sit earning 0.78 percent. The district includes the whole cities of Chino Hills, Brea, Placentia, Yorba Linda, and Villa Park, as well as portions of the cities of Anaheim, Fullerton, Orange, and Chino.

64th District

Republican Raul Ortiz Jr. with 43.2 percent of the vote, will face off in November against Rose Espinoza, a Democrat, who received 21.5 percent of the vote. The district includes the whole cities of Santa Fe Springs, Bell Gardens, Downey, La Mirada, Bell, Norwalk, Cudahy, and La Habra.

67th District

Democrat Sharon Quirk-Silva with 48.1 percent of the vote, will run in November against Republican Soo Yoo, who received 38.7 percent. The district includes the whole cities of Cerritos, La Palma, Hawaiian Gardens, Artesia, Buena Park, and Cypress, as well as portions of the cities of Fullerton and Anaheim.

68th District

Avelino Valencia, a Democrat and current Anaheim City councilman, received 48.2 percent of the vote. He will face off in November against Republican Mike Tardif, who received 23.5 percent of the vote. The district includes portions of the cities of Santa Ana, Orange, and Anaheim.

70th District

Diedre Thu-Ha Nguyen, a Democrat with 39.7 percent of the vote, will run in November against Tri Ta, a Republican, with 21.2 percent of the vote. The district includes the whole cities of Westminster, Stanton, Los Alamitos, Fountain Valley, and Garden Grove, as well as portions of the cities of Seal Beach, Santa Ana, and Huntington Beach.

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The California State Capitol building in Sacramento on April 18, 2022. (John Fredricks/The Epoch Times)

71st District

Matt Rahn received 51.8 percent of the vote, with Kate Sanchez at 48.1 percent. The two Republicans will be on the ballot again in November. The district includes the whole cities of Wildomar, Murrieta, Mission Viejo, Rancho Santa Margarita, and Temecula.

72nd District

Judie Mancuso, a Democrat, and Republican Diane Dixon are in a tight race in the primary with 43.3 percent and 42.6 percent, respectively, and both will advance to the general election. The district includes the whole cities of Laguna Hills, Aliso Viejo, Newport Beach, Laguna Woods, Laguna Beach, and Lake Forest, as well as portions of the cities of Seal Beach and Huntington Beach.

73rd District

Democrat Cottie Petrie-Norris will face Republican Steven Choi in the November general election, with 56.2 percent and 43.7 percent votes in the primary respectively. The district includes the whole cities of Costa Mesa and Irvine, as well as portions of the city of Tustin.

74th District

Laurie Davis, a Republican, has a comfortable lead over Democrat Chris Duncan, with 57.9 percent votes compared to Duncan’s 42 percent. The two will meet again in the November election. The district includes the whole cities of Laguna Niguel, Dana Point, Oceanside, San Juan Capistrano, Vista, and San Clemente and issues related to the Camp Pendleton Marine Corps base.

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“In God We Trust” hangs in the meeting area of the Orange County Board of Education in Costa Mesa, Calif., on Oct. 7, 2020. (John Fredricks/The Epoch Times)

Education

Orange County Superintendent of Schools

Incumbent Al Mijares won 54.8 percent of the vote to challenger Stefan Bean’s 45.1 percent. This race is decided by the primary. There is no advancement to the general election.

Orange County Board of Education Trustee (Area 2)

Incumbent Mari Barke retained her seat with 58.7 percent of the vote over challengers Martha Fluor, with 31.9 percent, and Christopher R. Ganiere, with 9.2 percent. This race is decided in the primary.

Orange County Board of Education Trustee (Area 4, Short Term)

Tim Shaw won back his seat on the education board with 49.9 percent of the vote, compared to the next highest vote-getter, Paulette Chaffee, who received 33.3 percent of the vote.

Orange County Board of Education Trustee (Area 5)

Incumbent Lisa Sparks retained her seat after beating challenger Sherine Smith by a vote of 64.7 percent to 35.2 percent.

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The Orange County Board of Supervisors meet in Santa Ana, Calif., on Aug. 25, 2020. (John Fredricks/The Epoch Times)

Orange County Supervisor

Orange County Supervisor 2nd District

Vicente Sarmiento continues to lead in this race with 35 percent of the votes, compared to Kim Nguyen at 22.2 percent. The top two vote-getters will face off in November.

Orange County Supervisor 4th District

In a close race, Sunny Park has 35.8 percent of the vote, compared to incumbent Doug Chaffee with 32.4 percent, and Steven Vargas with 31.7 percent.

Orange County Supervisor 5th District

Katrina Foley and Patricia Bates appear to be headed to a runoff in November with 41.7 percent and 22.1 percent of the vote respectively.

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The County of Orange, Calif., has voting ballot boxes available to local citizens as they walk toward government buildings in Santa Ana, Calif., on Sept. 18, 2020. (John Fredricks/The Epoch Times)

Other Orange County Offices

Assessor

Claude Parrish, incumbent, will retain his seat with 70.8 percent of the vote. Competitors Richard Foster earned 25 percent, and Larry Bales brought in 4.11 percent of the vote.

Auditor-Controller

Andrew N. Hamilton, with no competitors, was elected with 443,254 votes.

Clerk-Recorder

Incumbent Hugh Nguyen will also retain his seat winning 84.5 percent of the vote, over challengers Sandy Kimble and Steve Rocco with 8.1 percent and 7.3 percent votes respectively.

District Attorney

Incumbent Todd Spitzer has retained his position as Orange County DA with 62.4 percent of the vote over second-place challenger Pete Hardin, who received 21.2 percent of the vote.

Sheriff-Coroner

With no competitors, incumbent Sheriff Don Barnes has been reelected with 476,504.

Treasurer-Tax Collector

With no competitors, incumbent Shari L. Freidenrich won reelection with 478,368.

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Newport Beach Civic Center in Newport Beach, Calif., on Aug. 25, 2021. (John Fredricks/The Epoch Times)

Ballot Measures

Huntington Beach Measure A (Cannabis Business Tax)

The measure barely missed the two-thirds approval it needed to pass, with 64.5 percent “yes” votes and 35.4 percent “no” votes.

Newport Beach Measure B (Direct Election of Mayor)

A measure that would allow voters to elect the mayor of Newport Beach was defeated with 58.6 percent “no” votes compared to 41.3 percent “yes” votes.

Westminster Measure C (Eliminate Office of Elective Mayor and Increase Councilors from 4 to 5)

This measure also was defeated with “no” votes at 59.9 percent and “yes” at 40 percent.