Subscribe

Corruption Turning Afghan Prisons Into Taliban Bases

Imprisoned Taliban leaders coordinate attacks from within prison walls

By Joshua Philipp
Epoch Times Staff
Created: August 29, 2011 Last Updated: August 29, 2011
Related articles: World » South Asia
Print E-mail to a friend Give feedback

TALIBAN: Prisoners accused of being Taliban insurgents, as well as a suspected suicide bomber (R), sit in jail October 10, 2006 in Kabul, Afghanistan. (John Moore/Getty Images)

TALIBAN: Prisoners accused of being Taliban insurgents, as well as a suspected suicide bomber (R), sit in jail October 10, 2006 in Kabul, Afghanistan. (John Moore/Getty Images)

Cell Block 3 was in flames as prison riots continued in the next block over. The Taliban had grown too powerful, and the confinements of Afghanistan’s Pol-e-charki prison became little more than protective walls rendering them untouchable from the war raging outside.

The December 2008 riots at Pol-e-charki prison on the outskirts of Kabul served as a wake-up call to the severity of the corruption that had crept in through padded pockets and turning blind eyes. Captured Taliban commanders and radicalized prisoners had formed an operating center within Cell Block 3—armed with weapons, and with their own Shura Council to hold trials, vote, and eliminate those who refused to cooperate.

“The guards were not even allowed to go down into the cell block because they would be killed or kidnapped—I mean, its the Wild West out there,” said Drew Berquist, a former U.S. intelligence agent and author of “The Maverick Experiment,” in a phone interview.

Attention fell on the prison after the riots, and rebuilding efforts became focused on increasing security. This included eliminating cells for large groups, and replacing them with cells for smaller groups of between two and eight.

The safest place for the Taliban is the prisons because they can’t get caught again.

— Drew Berquist, author, former U.S. intelligence agent

“You had a prison that was run by the Afghan government, but really, entire facilities within that prison were being used as training and education grounds for insurgent elements,” said Drew Quinn, Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs director at the U.S. Embassy Kabul, on the NATO Channel in Nov. 2009.

Resolving such issues is no simple matter, and the battle behind prison walls continues to this day.

A rare news conference in Kabul, held by Afghanistan’s National Directorate of Security intelligence service in February, highlighted the breadth of the problem—noting that despite efforts to root out operations at Pul-e-Charkhi, it is still going strong.

Taliban commander Talib Jan, a prisoner at Pul-e-Charkhi, is one of the more extreme cases. He organizes suicide bombings across Kabul from within his cell—including the Jan. 28 suicide bombing of a supermarket that killed 14 people.

“Most of the terrorist and suicide attacks in Kabul were planned from inside this prison by this man,” said National Directorate of Security spokesman, Lutfullah Mashal, at the conference, New York Times reported.

The problem, according to Berquist, runs deep.

“The prison systems are corrupt,” Berquist said. “The safest place for the Taliban is the prisons because they can’t get caught again.”

PRISON BREAK: An Afghan policeman sits next to the entrance of the tunnel in room number seven of the Political Prisoner's section through which Taliban fighters escaped in an audacious jailbreak from Kandahar prison in southern Kandahar city on April 25. (STR/AFP/Getty Images)

PRISON BREAK: An Afghan policeman sits next to the entrance of the tunnel in room number seven of the Political Prisoner's section through which Taliban fighters escaped in an audacious jailbreak from Kandahar prison in southern Kandahar city on April 25. (STR/AFP/Getty Images)

Prisoners often use cell phones to communicate with, and give commands to, insurgents operating outside. Meanwhile, since captured Taliban and al-Qaeda leaders from across the country are at times detained together, the prisons give them an otherwise nonexistent opportunity to network and coordinate—since they are wary of gathering too many leaders in one place outside the prisons for fear of attack by unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) or special operations raids.

“The culture becomes so tough to break because these guys become so powerful within the prison,” Berquist said, adding that when they try to dismantle networks by moving prisoners to different cells, “they meet additional people and all it does is end up expanding things.”

Read more on Afghan Prisons Becoming Taliban Bases . . .





   

GET THE FREE DAILY E-NEWSLETTER


Selected Topics from The Epoch Times

Mann About Town