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British Election Results in Hung Parliament

Simon Veazey
Epoch Times Staff
Created: May 7, 2010 Last Updated: May 7, 2010
Related articles: World » Europe
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NOT QUITE: British opposition Conservative party leader David Cameron responds to the announcement that he had retained his seat as MP. His party gained the most votes and seats but fell short of the majority it needed to walk straight into government. (KIRSTY WIGGLESWORTH/AFP/Getty Images )

NOT QUITE: British opposition Conservative party leader David Cameron responds to the announcement that he had retained his seat as MP. His party gained the most votes and seats but fell short of the majority it needed to walk straight into government. (KIRSTY WIGGLESWORTH/AFP/Getty Images )

LONDON—The British election has resulted in a hung parliament, with the Conservative Party gaining the most seats but falling short of the overall majority that would automatically grant them governance.

The apparent meteoric rise of Nick Clegg failed dismally to translate from the opinion polls to the ballot box, with his Liberal Democrat Party increasing its share of the vote by only one per cent, and most likely losing seats.

The election results have not been all declared, with 24 constituencies still to announce results at present.

At present the Conservative seat count stands at 299, Labour at 255, and Lib Dems at 54.

However, it is clear from the results that the Conservative Party cannot win the majority needed to automatically claim the right to form a government.

The constitutional format in the result of a hung parliament means that Gordon Brown remains as prime minister and is given the option to try to form a government first. The only option open to Mr Brown would be to do a deal with Nick Clegg’s Lib Dem party.

However, Nick Clegg has indicated that his party will first talk to the Conservative Party about the possibility of forming a government together, having said during his election campaign that he would look to the party with the most seats and votes.

The UK has not had a hung parliament for since 1974.

It may take days before it becomes clear who will form the government as negotiations between the parties unfold.




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