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Chinese Communist Party’s 18th Congress May be Postponed

Factional infighting might lead to hiccup in leadership transition

By Liu Hui
NTD Television
Created: April 15, 2012 Last Updated: May 8, 2012
Related articles: China » Regime
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The 17th Chinese Communist Party (CCP) Congress on October 21, 2007 in Beijing. The CCP’s 18th National Congress, originally scheduled for the fall of 2012, may be postponed as a result of intensified infighting sparked by the Wang Lijun - Bo Xilai incident. (Guang Niu/Getty Images)

The 17th Chinese Communist Party (CCP) Congress on October 21, 2007 in Beijing. The CCP’s 18th National Congress, originally scheduled for the fall of 2012, may be postponed as a result of intensified infighting sparked by the Wang Lijun -- Bo Xilai incident. (Guang Niu/Getty Images)

The Chinese Communist Party’s (CCP’s) 18th National Congress, originally scheduled for the fall of 2012, may be postponed as a result of intensified infighting sparked by the Wang Lijun incident, according to Reuters.

Wang Lijun was the former Chongqing Public Security Chief whose failed defection attempt at the U.S. Consulate in Chengdu on Feb. 6 led to the dramatic fall of former Chongqing Communist Party Secretary Bo Xilai.

Click www.ept.ms/ccp-crisis to read about the most recent developments in the ongoing power struggle within the Chinese communist regime. In this special topic, we provide readers with the necessary context to understand the situation. Get the RSS feed. Get the Timeline of Events. Who are the Major Players? Chinese Regime in Crisis RSS Feed

On April 11, Reuters published the article “China braces for next act in leadership drama” that said: “In one sign of the Party’s unease, a source with ties to top leaders said the Communist Party was considering a proposal to delay the opening of the party congress to ‘shorten the transition period.’” 

A political commentator for the Chinese-language radio station Sound of Hope, Lan Shu, says that if the Congress were delayed, it would be due to a rift at the heart of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP): the officials who have participated in the persecution of Falun Gong, and those who have not, or who have opposed it. 

On the former side stands former Party leader Jiang Zemin, who is reportedly currently on his deathbed, and officials such as Bo Xilai and Zhou Yongkang, the security czar. On the other side is Wen Jiabao, who enjoys the tacit support of other leaders. 

Jiang’s faction, known as the “bloody hands,” because of their involvement in the incarceration, torture, and brainwashing of peaceful spiritual believers, has now been badly fragmented by the current infighting and Jiang’s deleterious health condition, Lan said. 

“Therefore a smooth transition of power will be difficult, and may prompt Hu and Wen to consider postponing the Congress,” Lan Shu said. “It’s possible that they will delay it to allow the current Politburo to maneuver an exchange of power between different factions, ” Lan said in an interview.

Recently, Chinese state media have loudly supported the Party’s decision to suspend Bo Xilai’s membership in the Politburo and Central Committee, claiming that China is a country ruled by law. 

But this won’t be enough to convince the populace in light of the June 4, 1989 massacre of students, and the unprecedented persecution of Falun Gong beginning in 1999, Lan said.

“The moral decay caused by the persecution of Falun Gong has created a deep social crisis in China,” Lan said. “ If premier Wen Jiabao is indeed going to solve China’s problems by tackling these two issues, it is his chance to take down Jiang’s faction, who is responsible for both of these blood debts.”

All the upset might also be a chance to push things further. “The crisis the CCP currently faces is a crisis of the social system and the doom of communism. The majority of Chinese people will think it’s a good thing if the CCP collapses today,” Lan said.

He continued: “Now Hu and Wen have more choice than Mao Zedong or Deng Xiaoping had. They can be the Gorbachev and Yeltsin of China.”

Read the original Chinese article

chinareports@epochtimes.com



  • roughlyright

    Not the Gorbachev and Yeltsin of China but the Putin and Medvedev  of China :-)

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/JB4IADRPD67IKFHU3PXMNHNIMM Itasca guy

    This is a sad tragedy. I hope they can find a path of decency and justice for all. I cannot imagine a good person wants corruption to be any peoples fate.


   

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