Woman Claims Red Cross Workers ‘Berated’ Her for Bringing 400 Hamburgers to Hurricane Victims

September 5, 2017 Updated: September 5, 2017    

A woman in Texas has alleged that Red Cross workers treated her poorly after she tried to bring 400 hamburgers to Hurricane Harvey evacuees at the Jack Brooks Regional Airport.

Lindsey Scott, in a Facebook post, said a husband and wife Red Cross team “berated” and “accosted” her for bringing the burgers, and she added that she was “astonished at the behavior of the Red Cross.”

“I was trying to bring 400 warm hamburgers to our hungry evacuees, who according to them did not need the food because they had ‘already had a sandwich,'” she wrote.

“Yes, they had 1 sandwich in 24 hours. They were desperate for a hot meal! The Red Cross proceeded to try and load the warm, ready to eat burgers into an ice chest,” she claimed.

She felt bad for the pilot, “who had donated his time, fuel, money, plane and arranged the delivery of the burgers.”

“I confess I just stood there with my mouth gaping open, fighting back tears while they told me that I did not know what I was doing and they had not even seen me volunteering. This is not a normal reaction for me but either exhaustion or pregnancy hormones got the best of me because I simply couldn’t find the words to fight back,” Scott continued.

An aerial photo shows damage caused by Hurricane Harvey in Rockport, Texas on Aug. 31, 2017. (REUTERS/DroneBase)
An aerial photo shows damage caused by Hurricane Harvey in Rockport, Texas on Aug. 31, 2017. (Reuters/DroneBase)

Scott used her sister’s Facebook page to post the message.

The Red Cross has not issued a comment on the alleged mishap.

In Harvey’s aftermath, at least 63 people were confirmed dead in southern Texas—as recovery efforts persist, CBS News reported on Tuesday.

Many large Texas employers, universities, and transit services are reopening or beginning full service on Tuesday, Sept. 9, the day after Labor Day. Some for the first time since Harvey struck the state on Aug. 25, Reuters reported.

The storm first hit Corpus Christi in the south and traveled up the coast, dumping up to 51 inches of rain in places across the region and flooding homes and businesses.

A mansion surrounded by floodwater after torrential rains pounded Southeast Texas is seen on August 31, 2017 near Sugar Land, Texas. While tempting for looters, law enforcement agencies are pledging increased penalties and determined prosecutions for crimes like looting and burglary committed in the wake of Hurricane Harvey. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)
A mansion surrounded by flood water after torrential rains pounded Southeast Texas is seen on August 31, 2017, near Sugar Land, Texas. While tempting for looters, law enforcement agencies are pledging increased penalties and determined prosecutions for crimes like looting and burglary committed in the wake of Hurricane Harvey. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Texas residents who fled to Austin, San Antonio, and Dallas ahead of the storm returned to check on their homes as flooded streets drained.

Houston Metro, a regional transit provider, said it would open all its parking lots and rush-hour lanes on Tuesday.

Reuters contributed to this report.